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  1. Since the one we currently have is kinda outdated (and ugly ) I decided to make this thread! Ofcourse, if you like the current one, you can vote for that one. 01. 02. 03. 04. 05. 06. 07.
  2. Light Years

    Other

    You might have seen her in the Gaga and Madonna sections (or maybe somewhere else I dunno) but I'm bringing this game to the Kylie section The rules are pretty simple. I'll start by posting a picture related to a Kylie song in some way, then the person who guesses correctly posts a picture next, and it keeps on going Starting with one that is (hopefully) easy:
  3. Provocative and – at the time – shocking, Madonna's fourth album 'Like A Prayer' rocked the establishment, and set a new template for self-empowered women in pop. The Blond Ambition world tour that followed, meanwhile, changed the face of live music forever. On the 30th anniversary of the album's release, El Hunt tells the story Some albums are worth judging by their cover. With two thumbs poked defiantly into a denim waistband – like a bedazzled answer to Bruce Springsteen’s ‘Born in the USA’ – the artwork for ‘Like A Prayer’ is the perfect visual for Madonna’s audacious, unflinching fourth record. Released on March 21, 1989, this daring exploration of catholicism, desire, bereavement, superstardom and pleasure is an unparalleled totem of pop music 30 years on. Arriving three years after ‘True Blue‘, a record of bright, loved-up bubblegum pop gold, ‘Like A Prayer’ is abrasive and raw. Moving the focus away from presenting a collection of immediate wall-to-wall bangers, Madonna’s 1989 release feels more concerned with exploration instead. Hulking great ballad ‘Oh Father’ cleverly alludes to her fractured relationship with her father and god at the same time; not your typical album fodder. ‘’Till Death Do Us Part’ also nods toward her split from her then-husband. “I’m not your friend, I’m just your little wife,” Madonna sings, atop jaunty, fidgeting melodies. While ‘True Blue’ talked vaguely about lust – the “desire burning inside of me” on ‘Open Your Heart’ – here the door is flung overtly off its hinges. Madonna was brought up a Catholic, and ‘Like A Prayer’ unpacks how self-pleasure and sex can stack up next to devout faith. In Madonna’s world, desire is holy. “In Catholicism you are a born sinner and you’re a sinner all your life,” Madonna told Interview Magazine in 1989. “No matter how you try to get away from it, the sin is within you all the time. It was this fear that haunted me; it taunted and pained me every moment. My music was probably the only distraction I had.” In the tabloids, Madonna was treated like music’s most sinful villain. A copy of The Sun, from November 1989, derides the singer for having a “whore’s foul mouth” (charming!) and takes great pleasure in tearing apart her revealing outfits. The gossip papers rabidly followed her every move; reporting joyously on the breakdown of her marriage to Sean Penn, and gleefully branding her movie project Who’s That Girl a ‘flop’. ‘Like A Prayer’ seizes back the narrative, and yet, it’s not bound to being firmly autobiographical. Sure, it’s confessional, but in a sexier, more abstract way that plays with conventional ideas of sin. “Catholicism’s such a dramatic religion,” Madonna told NME in 1995. “There’s a lot of pomp and circumstance and ritual and punishment and when you’ve sinned you go to a dark curtained booth and tell the priest all the bad things you’ve done and it’s all so… kinky!” Which brings us onto ‘Like A Prayer’s sardonic closer. ‘Act of Contrition’ starts out earnestly, reciting solemn prayer atop yowls of guitar; listing various sins and asking for forgiveness in husky tones. Hamming it up for the tabloids, Madonna’s repentance is short-lived. “I have a reservation!” she growls fiercely, parodying the entitlement and pettiness of superstardom. “What do you mean it’s not in the computer?!?!” On its release, ‘Like A Prayer’ caused almost immediate controversy. Its title track infamously debuted during a Pepsi commercial, with a visual helmed by Space Jam director Joe Pytka. The fizzy drink super-corp paid Madonna $5 million for her appearance, eager for one of the world’s biggest superstars to endorse their brown beverages. To sweeten the deal even further, they also slapped a sponsorship stamp on her forthcoming world tour. The next day, Madonna’s iconic and controversial ‘Like A Prayer’ music video was released. Against a barren landscape of flaming crucifixes, Madonna wanders into an empty Catholic church. There, she’s immediately drawn to a weeping statue of a black saint, and kneeling before him, she anoints the statue’s feet and finds stigmata on her hands; playing a Mary Magdalene type figure and drawing on blatant religious iconography, Madonna’s interested in how the Bible’s “sinful woman” actually represents something sacred and worthy of celebration. Later, the video depicts the saint statue coming *ahem* to life, and things get very raunchy. The song itself draws parallels between intense sexual pleasure and transcending to a higher spiritual plane. Basically, no prizes for guessing what variety of moaning Madge is on about when she’s down on her knees, telling the Messianic figure that he’s “like an angel sighing”. Predictably, conservative Pepsi-gluggers everywhere were outraged by Madonna’s audacity: how dare this wanton woman taint innocent viewers with her alternative explorations of sin, sex, and religion. In response, they began to boycott Pepsi’s products. The global corporation swiftly cut ties, pulling the original ad, along with their brand-stamping of her tour. As for Madonna? Well, she didn’t give a shit, first of all, because Pepsi let her keep the fee anyway. Cracking on with her artistic vision for the record’s roll-out, she renamed the live run. The ‘Like A Prayer’ tour became Blond Ambition tour. It’s no exaggeration to state that every pop production you’ve ever seen since is indebted to the show’s immense vision. And far from being knocked by the headlines around her, Madonna thrived in the face of controversy. Divided into five distinct segments – Metropolis, Religious, Dick Tracy, Art Deco and Encore – Blond Ambition was far more like theatre production than conventional concert; with elaborate costumes and intricate sets that referenced everything from A Clockwork Orange and Fritz Lang to high fashion and performance art. And at the same time as she opened up a dialogue around sex, Madonna also chose to use her huge platform to bring the AIDS epidemic to the forefront. Each copy of ‘Like A Prayer’ came with a ‘The Facts About Aids’ information card. At live shows, she spread clear messages about practicing safer sex, and chose to dedicate her final American date to her friend, the late Keith Haring. Her New Jersey show alone raised $300,000 for The Foundation for AIDS Research, at a time when the disease was widely feared and misunderstood by the public, and LGBT+ people were disproportionately discriminated against. “Put a condom on your willy,” Madonna would tell the audience. “What Madonna said to me was this’” recounts Luis Camacho Xtravaganza, who toured the world as a backing dancer on the Blond Ambition tour. “‘There’s no such thing as bad press, honey, there’s no such thing as bad press,” he remembers with a cackle. “‘Worry when they’re not talking about you’” A member of New York City’s legendary ballroom leaders House of Xtravaganza, Luis choreographed the ‘Vogue’ music video with fellow voguer Jose Gutierez Xtravaganza, and he quickly become drawn to Madonna’s total lack of artistic compromise. Born and raised a “kid from the projects” on the Lower East Side – “I didn’t grow up with a silver spoon in my mouth,” Luis says – the whole experience of touring the world was dizzying enough. And as rehearsals went on, he realised he was a part of something truly historic. “Madonna wanted to take things further,” Luis says. “Her vision was elevating the concert formula to a level of theatre. Inserting art into that, too, she really wanted to give the audience an experience, rather than them just going to a concert and seeing somebody sing into a mic. I really think she was a pioneer in that. She set the stage for concert shows and experiences, for any show that followed.” he says. “She is good at pushing boundaries and buttons and making people feel something from what she’s doing, whether that feeling is good or bad,” Luis observes. “She’s fearless – I love that she knows what she wants, and will bring it to the forefront, regardless of what people might think. An artist should be true to her platform, and she was true to hers. And very unapologetic about it. I love that about her.” The Pope, Vatican State, and several other Catholic groups begged to differ, taking issue with Madonna’s ‘blasphemous’ use of religious iconography. Meanwhile the Toronto police force threatened the star with arrest, claiming that her notorious performance of ‘Like A Virgin’ – which featured Madonna joyously simulating masturbation atop a luxurious velvet bed placed centre stage, flanked by two men with enormous stuffed breasts – was in breach of obscenity laws. “Do you think that I’m a bad girl?” Madonna asked the endless crowds at her final show in the Canadian city, as police looked on. “Do you think that I deserve to be arrested?” she goaded them. “I hope so,” she decided, before promptly launching into the full, uncensored routine. Ultimately, the threatened arrest never happened, but Madonna was fully prepared to take the risk. Ian Cottrell – who now runs the long-running Dirty Pop club night at Cardiff’s Clwb Ifor Bach – went to see Madonna’s show at Wembley Stadium show when he was 17, and halfway through sixth form. “I just remember the pure excitement of her coming on stage and opening with ‘Express Yourself”” he says. “The dancers, the industrial set, Shep Pettibone’s beats, and then Madonna, appearing at the top of the stairs in the iconic suit from the [song’s] video, with the bra poking through. She asked “DO YOU BELIEVE IN LOVE?!” And we we all went crazy.” Marching down the stairs in a business suit, Madonna soon rips off the jacket to reveal a golden corset with those infamously cartoonish, pointed breasts; designed by Jean-Paul Gaultier. Straddling helpless male dancers on the floor, grabbing her crotch, and thrusting – to ear-piercing screams – this was a strong, athletic woman taking full ownership of her sexuality, and her own pleasures and desire. “Bloomin’ heck, we were new Christians at the time, and I didn’t know what to do with myself!” says Janet, now 56, who was at the Wembley Stadium Blond Ambition show with her husband in 1990. The pair had recently found faith. “There was this whole thing about sex on the altar: that was very out there, and at that time, shocking. I don’t say the f-word, and so this one woman getting everyone to chant it was shocking for me [Madonna asked Wembley to chant the word in order to reclaim it]. All these male dancers were utterly in bondage, submitting to Madonna. And the outfits! Nobody dressed like that.” “It was hilarious in some respects because we’d gone from seeing [Evangelist preacher] Billy Graham there, to seeing Madonna,” Janet laughs. “She’s had a Catholic upbringing, and she didn’t seem to be denouncing it, but I remember I wasn’t sure if I was allowed to like it, in some respects,” Janet admits. “I will always remember those very hard, stiff conical bosoms,” she exclaims. “They were fascinating for me, as somebody who sews! The whole conical bosoms business, incredible…“ Think of the whips and chains of Rihanna’s ‘S&M’, Ariana Grande’s ‘Side to Side’ (according to Ariana, it’s a song about feeling a bit, um, sore after a vigorous night of pash) Christine and The Queens’ macho-femme articulations of desire, and countless other pop greats who emerged post-Madonna, and traces of ‘Like A Prayer’ and Blond Ambition linger in their every move. Watch a pop show now, and you may well take the sheer scale of production for granted. From Troye Sivan rising onto the stage of Hammersmith Apollo while reclined on the sofa of a full living room set, to Lorde performing ‘Melodrama’ inside a floating box with a rotating cast of characters within, pop’s motto has become go big, or go home. When Olly Alexander gyrated steamily behind a floodlit curtain on Years & Years recent ‘Sanctify’ tour (the group were supported, no less, by London vogue house Kiki House of Tea) the nods to Madonna were clear and deliberate. ‘Like A Prayer’ – and the genius of the Blond Ambition tour – led the way to all of this bold, visual expression, making room in the pop landscape for artists with ambitious, conceptual ideas that provoke discussion and nimbly tread the line between euphoria and danger. “As with everything that involves something that is a hot button – the [masturbation] simulation on stage, stuff like that – you’re always gonna have people who root for it, and others who aren’t enthused,” Luis says. “If it fits, then do it regardless – it’s expression.” “I think it was a great forerunner for what we have now,” Ian concludes. “Blond Ambition definitely raised the bar, and where Madonna led at that time, people had to follow.“ https://www.nme.com/features/sex-religion-death-conical-bras-madonnas-like-prayer-blond-ambition-tour-30-2463908
  4. As 1989 began, there was no question that Madonna was already a decade-defining superstar. But no one knew if she, like Bee Gees to the ‘70s or Beach Boys to the ‘60s, would prove a decade-constricted artist whose relevance would wane as a new decade turned over. Like a Prayer, the magnum opus of her first decade and arguably her defining creative statement, came out 30 years ago today (March 21, 1989) and established that Madonna was not a pop star for her time, but for all time. And in the process, it gave us one of the most unlikely No. 1 smashes of her (or any career) and forced the world beyond her teenage fanbase to acknowledge her formidable vision. Since history is written by the victors, Madonna maintaining her pop culture dominance well past the ‘80s seems like a historical inevitability these days. But in 1989, that was hardly the case. While she’d netted six Billboard Hot 100 No. 1s prior to Like A Prayer and released five smash albums (three studio LPs, a soundtrack and a remix album), her sound had remained decidedly of the era up until this point. Even as her subject matter deepened on 1986’s True Blue(dedicated to husband Sean Penn, from whom she’d file for divorce in Jan. 1989), the sonic palette was unmistakably ‘80s: bubbling dance-pop for the high-energy numbers, pounding beats and widescreen production for the ballads, and her voice only occasionally stretching for maturation (as on “Live to Tell”). Not that there’s anything wrong with that. These were sounds that had served her Madgesty well for five years, and the three studio albums that precede Like a Prayerare unmistakable classics in their own right. But Madonna has always been a savvy tealeaf reader, and in 1989, she must’ve seen the wind of change coming. As she wrapped the decade and prepped her career for phase 2, Madonna moved in a direction that was simultaneously more ambitious and yet more traditional, pushing boundaries while courting an adult audience for the first time. As the lead single and first track, “Like a Prayer” was the opening salvo that catapulted Madonna into a controversy she emerged virtually unscathed from. Although religious backlash to its Mary Lambert-directed video -- which depicted white supremacists, cross burning and an erotic encounter with a saint in a dream -- would push Pepsi to can an ad they’d already paid $5 million for, the wider world seemed to side with Madonna that her video was an artistic statement and its critics were mere pearl clutchers (not long after, however, the tide would start to turn against her when she began simulating masturbation in performances). The song was a smash, becoming her seventh Hot 100 No. 1 (reigning for three weeks) and establishing that Madonna was capable of expanding her sound well past mall pop without sacrificing any of her commercial success. The structurally complex, multi-part epic melded an earnest Gospel choir, funk-pop riffage and searing guitar lines (some from Prince), culminating in a transcendent sing-along that established her as a pop chameleon, not just a Danceteria alumnus content to regurgitate old trends. The lyrics were similarly bold; by blurring the lines between the divine and the profane (“I’m down on my knees / I wanna take you there”), she began an unflinching conversation on human sexuality that would reach its apex in her ‘90s output. The comparatively straightforward follow-up single “Express Yourself” -- a buoyant, defiant declaration of self-worth -- was certainly more in the dance-pop realm, but even here, the song is punctuated by irrepressible, warm Motown horns that throw back to an earlier era. Third single “Cherish” was similarly crafty. On its surface it reads like a frothy ‘80s pop tune, but its bones are in ‘50s doo-wop, and it contains a lyrical reference to The Association’s 1966 hit “Cherish.” Both singles sounded contemporary and were still aimed at the youth market, but they existed within a context the previous generation would understand and appreciate as well. This move past dance-pop and synthpop (for the time -- she would return to both at points) was hugely important for Madonna in 1989. Around that period, if you wanted to be taken seriously by your industry peers and the critics, you could make pop, sure -- but it had to be grown-up pop with elements of genres the powers that be did take seriously, i.e., guitar rock, Motown, Gospel, baroque pop. And she did. She expertly stretched into the latter genre with “Promise to Try” and the stately-yet-personal “Oh Father,” a solemn ballad about her life after the loss of her mother at age five. The fact that “Oh Father” became her first Hot 100 hit since “Holiday” to miss the top 10 really didn’t even matter (it peaked at No. 20); with this song, Madonna established herself as a serious balladeer who could tackle cross-generational, mature material, and that opened numerous doors for her in the ‘90s. The rest of the album, easily her most eclectic up until that point, flirted with a variety of flavors befitting a pop star looking to establish their versatility: “Dear Jessie” is nursery pop/psychedelia for co-writer Patrick Leonard’s daughter; “Keep It Together” is hard-slamming ‘70s R&B influenced by Sly Stone; “Spanish Eyes” is her Flamenco-tinged lament to those lost in the AIDS epidemic; “Till Death Do Us Part” is a harrowing account of domestic violence set, unexpectedly, to an anxious bubble of runaway synths; and the impact of Prince is all over their funky, slow-grinding not-a-love-song love song “Love Song.” He also pops up for album closer “Act of Contrition,” which is built around one of his guitar solos and segments of the gospel choir played backward. As these noisy tape loops build to an unsettling climax, Madonna retices the Catholic prayer of repentance, but loses her way before finishing it, veering from the sacred to the secular with a full-throated rant about a lost restaurant reservation -- and just before it ends, Prince’s guitar noodles off into the stratosphere. It’s a strange, arty way to end an album, and a far cry from the crystal-clear message of “Love Makes the World Go Round” that Madonna used to wrap True Blue, her previous studio album. But that’s the point. Here is where Madonna planted her flag not just as a superstar but as an Artist, someone willing to take risks, push into unmined territory and still come out with a chart-topper, two No. 2 hits and the best reviews of her career up until that point. With callbacks to previous eras and forays into revered genres, Madonna began to expand her fanbase into the ‘adult pop’ realm without sacrificing her youth culture bona fides. It was a deft balancing act, and one that certainly couldn’t last forever, but on Like a Prayer, Madonna established that she was a pop star who happened to come from the ‘80s, not a product of the ‘80s -- and that she would remain relevant long after her peers faded into memory like a Rubik’s Cube or Teddy Ruxpin. https://www.billboard.com/articles/columns/pop/8503430/madonna-like-a-prayer-album-superstar-artist
  5. Being the sad sack I am with nothing better to do - I spent my time perfecting all of these fantasy setlists for anyone who cares KYLIE MINOGUE TOUR 1995 BODY LANGUAGE TOUR 2004 ANTI TOUR II ORCHESTRAL TOUR 2013 THE KYLIE FAREWELL TOUR SUMMER 2019
  6. Aidan.

    Other

    Showgirl - The Greatest Hits Tour began in Glasgow, Scotland Marked a huge milestone in her career as well as her biggest ever struggle
  7. ...what would you do? I'd put all the stan bullshit aside and try to really get to know her.We would probably have tea and go shopping afterwards
  8. Ultraviolet

    Other

    I am Willing to make an Unreleased Masterpost if people are interested. If you want these albums comment
  9. I REALISED WE HADN'T HAVE ONE So I made one So I'm listening to Greedy right now
  10. Ariana really giving the young girls no excuse to not go out and vote in 2020 huh!
  11. MichaelDaFighter

    Other

    Hello you beautiful Fighters Im meeting Xtina on May 31 for the Xperience and I'm hoping I can get her to autograph my arm or something so I can get it tattoo'd over after the show... does anyone know if this is realistic or not Has anyone else had luck trying to make this happen?
  12. Attention to all my fellow last.fm/FOTP hybrids I'm a bit late and you might already know but we have finally been blessed with an edit scrobble feature to merge our standard and deluxe version/edition albums... and - Single albums into their respective studio albums! And if you're like me and made the switch to Spotify, editing your iTunes album titles to Spotify's! YOU MUST BE A SUBSCRIBER! $3 Last FM's announcement How to bulk edit Bulk edit script
  13. Have been looking into this more lately and she has sampled some pretty obscure stuff Through The Years mp3 Here are some Shocked Fever 2002 Sampled Spinning Around Fever 2002 Sampled Put Yourself In My Place Fever 2002 Sampled Cowboy Style Fever 2002 Sampled These Some screen visuals inspired by these too On A Night Like This Money Can't Buy Sampled Spinning Around Showgirls Sampled Especially For You Showgirls Sampled I Should Be So Lucky Homecoming Sampled Can't Get You Out Of My Head Homecoming Sampled Light Years Homecoming Sampled Heart Beat Rock X 2008 Sampled Loveboat X 2008 Sampled Spinning Around X 2008 Sampled On A Night Like This Les Folies Sampled CGYOOMH Golden Tour Sampled Slow Golden Tour Sampled The Locomotion Golden Tour Sampled
  14. It's from his Spotify Singles release that also includes a remix from his song "I'll Be Fine Somehow" with Julie Bergan from his #1 album "Identification".
  15. Xtinaislife

    Other

    Does anybody know of a place we can find a high quality version of Little Dreamer? It’s one of her best songs but I feel like it’s impossible to find and unless you already own it you’re SOL. I just really want a version where the audio isn’t peaking and sounding rubbish.
  16. Chris Morlock

    Other

    im gonna put an alphabetical list of every song in Kesha's discography (released and unreleased) stolen from the Lana Del Rey section with permission. songs from Animal songs from Cannibal songs from Warrior songs from Deconstructed songs from Rainbow songs that are unreleased unleaked/registered on BMI, etc Non-album songs songs as a featured artist
  17. Hermione

    Other

    Just a couple of weeks ago we were having blizzards, but for the first time in like six months it's sunny and 67 degrees Fahrenheit here. My seasonal depression has been found dead thanks to daylight savings, midterms being over, and the sudden change of weather all lining up at the same time so I'm looking for fun upbeat seasonal bops to play now! Some of my favorites of past years are: Lush Life by Zara Girlfriend by Avril California Gurls by Katy Problem by Ariana We Found Love by Rihanna I Like It by Cardi Call Me Maybe by Carly Long Hot Summer by Girls Aloud Primadonna by Marina Make Me Feel by Janelle Monae Worth It by Fifth Harmony Black Magic by Little Mix Stay/The Middle/and honestly most of the pop girl/DJ collabs Starships by Nicki (I said past years, pls don't come for me) pretty much anything Shakira has ever done And I'm sure this year I'll be playing Juice by Lizzo nonstop. What are your favorite spring/summer songs and what's your pick for song of the summer this year?
  18. Madonna

    Other

    I think it is about time that we do one of these. If you want to be added to the tag list, comment in this thread and I will add you to the OP! If you know someone that you know is a little Medonster, make sure to mention them in the thread so they can ask to be added! Oh and feel free to suggest a cute subtitle! @Lachlan could you pin this thread please? @Madonna - Rebel @Nocturn - Historian @Rebel Bitch - M-Dolla @Unapologetic Bitch - Dita @ParentalAdvisory - Tony Ward @Régine Filange - Spanish Eyes @Jjang - Master Debater @Chris Morlock - Virgin @Dookie Quill - Mer Girl @Freaky Prince - Spy @Kuba - Almost Stan @Rachel Green - Magic @Angelus - Statistician @Saiga - Diplomat @Earth Ripper - Essayist @Lord Stoneheart - Joan of Arc @sonowgoodbye - Naughty Nun @Vertigo-go - Clown @Unique - Evita @Dennis Reynolds - Star @SpringwoodSlasher - Beautiful Killer @Shiver - Esther @Mint - Brahim @Sydney - Material Girl @Princess Aurora - Disco Diva @Pandora - Bad Girl @PhCh - Sinner @Nixter - Veronica Electronica @Nick - President @Systemagic - Runaway Lover @Emperor Nick - Queen @Reputation - Cowgirl @Kirjava - Geisha @SZA - Yeezus @King Perry - Best Friend @Jose - Candy Perfume Girl @JMQDB - Jessie @jdpm1991 - Pop Princess @JENNA GAGA - Thief of Hearts @Impossible Princess - La Petite Jeune Fille @Hot as Ice - Señorita @witchcraft. - Sticky & Sweet @Dawni - Future Lover @Solaris Lorica - Jesus Luz @BJORK - Olga @Diamond - Immaculate Collection @Justas - Gypsy @Milk - Bedtime Story Teller @Liam - Little Star @Lachlan - Lucky Star @Satori - Shanti @Solly - Candy Store Owner @#Music - Mr. DJ @JustHereForX - NYC @Courtney Love - VMAs 1995 @SockBitch - Guy Oseary @Maryanne - Vogue @LoanSPW - Angel @Vulnicura. - Bourgeoisie Rebel @Station to Station - Drunk by 6 @Kenny Mccormick - Bhad Bitch @KingOfTheClouds - American Bitch @The One Below All - Golden Shower @Monster - Girl Gone Wild @Lyric - Future Pop Diva @Stacey Q's Greatest Hits - Autotune Baby @Imperfect - Beautiful Scars @Purity - Blood Countess The cemetery:
  19. Aidan.

    Other

    I live for kute moments like this She was having issues with her belt during the Studio 54 akt and ended up having to hold her monitor in the end She looks to have issues with it throughout the entire akt See around 1H 11M and 1H 21M 30S for the best parts of this beltgate before she eventually chucks it around 1H 22M Oh and this is also full footage of the Adelaide show
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