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Found 594 results

  1. Lucifer's Angel

    Review

    Hello, I've compiled a list of the 20 best Madonna live performances, ever! I hope you'll enjoy my countdown #20-18 #17-15 #14-11 #10-8 #7-6 #5-4 #3-2 #1 Madonna delivered so many excellent performances, so it is quite challenging to rank them all. Do you agree with my list? Which of those performances don't deserve to be in the top 20 and which ones should be there, according to you?
  2. Roman Zolanski

    Review

    Almost 1 year since it got released luvs Pipe Deserve Twice Maria Sick of Sittin' Accelerate Masochist Right Moves Like I Do Unless It's With You Fall in Line
  3. ParallaxNick

    Review

    Ever since I saw Infinity Train a few days ago it's been breaking my mind: which is the best version of Word Up? I have a pretty good idea what the worst one is. but I can't make up my mind as to the best: Cameo Korn Gun Mel B Little Mix The BossHoss
  4. Madonna

    Review

    Honeymoon Music to Watch Boys to Terrence Loves You God Knows I Tried High By the Beach Freak Art Deco Burnt Norton (Interlude) Religion Salvatore The Blackest Day 24 Swan Song Don't Let Me Be Misunderstood
  5. https://www.metacritic.com/music/homecoming-the-live-album/beyonce the Slay Lemonade is at 92 and he is the only woman in history with two albums over 90 The power that that has
  6. https://www.metacritic.com/movie/the-lion-king-2019 was 49
  7. Freaky Prince

    Review

    Beautiful Killer Girl Gone Wild Love Spent Gang Bang Masterpiece I'm Addicted I'm A Sinner I Don't Give A Best Friend Give Me All Your Luvin' Turn Up The Radio Some Girls Superstar Falling Free B-Day Song I Fucked Up I forgot how good this album was... MDNA > RH > HC, but that's a whole other talk...
  8. Madonna

    Review

    Since @Phoebe brought the "Rank XY" trend to the Lana section... Cruel World Ultraviolence Shades of Cool Brooklyn Baby West Coast Sad Girl Pretty When You Cry Money Power Glory Fucked My Way Up to the Top Old Money The Other Woman Black Beauty Guns & Roses Florida Kilos Is This Happiness Flipside
  9. Aidan.

    Review

    Hello Medonsters It has been over a month since MX was released so I thought it was time for my review For this one I am going to do something a little different and rate each song according to production, vocals and lyrics - Each will be scored out of a max of 10 points for an overall total of 30 points per song If the song has a feature then this will be factored into the vocals score Let's get started
  10. Roman Zolanski

    Review

    Cola Bel Air Body Electric Ride Gods & Monsters American Burning Desire Blue Velvet Yayo
  11. Roman Zolanski

    Review

    Aphrodite: Les Folies Tour KylieX2008 Showgirl: The Homecoming Tour KylieFever2002 Kiss Me Once Tour Showgirl: The Greatest Hits Tour Golden Tour Aphrodite and X are really close for me, but I put Aphrodyke at the top because I'm obsessed with Greek mythology and that storyline... whew. But when it comes to energy, costumes and remixes/new arrangements of songs, X easily takes the crown. Share your ranking rats
  12. Beyoncé

    Discussion

    Right girls and gays time to rank. As you all know Beyoncé is one of the greatest performers of all time, meaning every single one of her tours are incredible. However some are quite clearly better than others. Time to see who has taste and who doesn't You can include OTR and OTR II if you want to but I won't as they were joint tours and y'all know how I feel about Jay-Z The Formation World Tour I Am... World Tour The Mrs. Carter Show World Tour The Beyoncé Experience Dangerously in Love Tour Wow all her tours really show her growth as an artist and performer don't they Don't forget to leave your ranking
  13. kminogues

    Review

    Right, so I’m bored and decided to do a track by track review of Kylie’s second best album. So letsgettoit.mp3 Slow - Amazing from start to finish. Still sounds fresh despite being 16 years old. It just oozes sophistication. I love the key change midway through and the “read my...BODY LANGUAGE” bit slays. An easy 10/10 Still Standing - I’ve never cared too much for this song. It feels a bit weak coming off the heels of Slow. Nothing to write home about. 5/10 Secret (Take You Home) - This Grindr anthem! I love her tweaked vocals on this one. Experimentlie jumped out! It shows how weak Still Shitting is being sandwiched between two of her best songs. 9/10 Promises - One of her most underrated and more lyrically mature songs. I love the production. 7/10 Sweet Music - This one is a bit silly but BOPS HARD. It’s everything Still Shitting wishes it was and tried to accomplish. My only complaint is that it’s a tad too long. It starts to drag a little. 9/10 Red Blooded Woman - One of her best singles EVER. The “boy, boy” echo effect during the chorus is responsible for my faggotry as well as the little dance routine she does. I remember trying to imitate the moves when I first saw the video clip. Kylie really sang about how much she needs cock, huh? An easy 10/10 Chocolate - But wow, what a moment I will never forget. My second fave song from the album and the video is too much of a servation! I love the “Like chocolate, come here. Zoom in...” bit. I also like the radio edit and feel it’s unfairly looked at poorly by some stans. It’s definitely not as good as the album version but it still bops. 10/10 Obsession - Filler and a little basic but cute. 6/10 I Feel 4 U - Let’s praise one of the best songs on the album! I love the intro/outro of the rain and thundering. It reminds me of Rain by Madonna (one of my all-time fave Vadge songs). I love her vocals on this track. It’s a fun, catchy song and deserves more love. Someday - ABSOLUTE SHIT! The only song I routinely skip. Too fucking long and boring. Also reminds me of my asshole of an ex-boyfriend, so. 1/10 Loving Days - Another serve. Again, this song deserves more praise than it’s given. Kylie really had cock on her mind when making this record, didn’t she? Let me put this on repeat. 10/10 After Dark - I love the chorus. It’s a good closer for the standard track list. 8/10 Slo Motion - THE BEST SONG ON THE ALBUM. I’ll never understand why she relegated this to an Australia only bonus track because it deserves to be on every edition it’s that GODLY. I love the seductive vibe she sings with. Definitely a song to play when getting your hole wrecked/wrecking a hole 10/10 Cruise Control - It amazes me that Still Shitting and Flopday made the standard track list but this didn’t. I do like the version with Sean Paul that’s on the Red Blooded Woman single a bit better though. 8/10 You Make Me Feel - Feels a bit like the sister to After Dark. Again, should have been on the standard album and not a bonus track. I love the second verse in particular. 9/10 alright faggots, thanks for reading. Now do the right thing and stream Bible Language
  14. https://www.telegraph.co.uk/music/what-to-listen-to/kylie-minogue-glastonbury-review-big-tunes-oodles-charm-hard/
  15. https://www.theguardian.com/music/2019/jun/30/kylie-at-glastonbury-2019-review?CMP=Share_AndroidApp_Tweet
  16. “She is a cha cha instructor, a professor, a head of state, a teacher, a nun,” is how Madonna describes her most recent alter ego covering her latest album, Madame X. In the months anticipating its release, the pop icon teased fans with imagery of the eye-patched emissary, in addition to releasing several collaborations featuring Maluma, Quavo, and Swae Lee. Some reviews deem the pop star’s latest release as a bizarre and rambunctious mixture of sound, when in fact, these things make for an interesting and compelling piece of work. This metamorphosis of sound and image reveals not only that Madonna is still a master of her craft, but that she can continue to captivate audiences with bold creativity. The diversity of Madonna’s discography spans far and wide, ranging from the 1984 classic “Like a Virgin,” to her evolution into modern sound with “Ray of Light.” Throughout these changing eras, the music legend managed to remain at the top of her game, morphing from one persona to the next in an almost seamless way. Her new album is certainly no exception, solidifying Madonna as an ever-evolving songstress with an eye for all things avant-garde. The singer can add being trilingual to her list of talents, as the album includes songs in English, Portuguese, and Spanish. Influenced predominately from her time living in Lisbon, Portugal, the “Hung Up” belter’s newest release boasts a host of musical influences. Songs like “Faz Gostoso” featuring Anitta and “Medellín” featuring Maluma are testaments to Madge’s rare ability to effectively cross musical genres. Even more noticeable on one her solo tracks, “Crazy,” Madonna exudes a comfortable incorporation of both her personal style and an appreciation for multicultural artistry. Further embellishing Madame X‘s tinge of musical experimentation, Madonna includes hints of hip hop on the songs “Future” featuring Quavo and “Crave” with Swae Lee. But the album’s prized gems are arguably the dance-floor anthems “God Control” and “I Don’t Search I Find,” which are reminiscent of Confessions on a Dance Floor. Opening with a somber choir and a call to action advocating for gun control in America, “God Control” gives way to a disco wonderland. “This is your wake up call,” Madonna utters over the sounds of two gunshots and a boogie beat, a seemingly paradoxical juxtaposition. By being able to make us dance to a grim message with a celebratory tone, it is evident that Madame X herself is able to successfully apply her artistry in every facet. According to Billboard, over 90% of Madonna’s 17-show-run in New York is sold out, in addition to Madame X being expected to debut at #1 on the Billboard 200 chart with 90k-100k copies, giving the “Music” singer her first number one since her 2012 anthology, MDNA. If Madame X tells us anything, it’s that Madonna still takes her artistry and legacy seriously. The icon has added yet another acclaimed piece to her body of work that also happens to be one of her most eccentric efforts yet, which in turn, may become her most successful. https://www.popcravenews.com/madonna-cements-herself-as-a-musical-chameleon-with-madame-x/
  17. Title When it comes to lyrics, I gotta say that Ray of Light, Like a Prayer, Confessions on a Dance Floor and Bedtime Stories are her best written albums. Rebel Heart and Erotica are well written as well. But when it comes to production, have to give that title to Ray of Light. What about you?
  18. Agent X

    Review

    I'm not usually one for an "album trailer," but I found the teaser for Madame X incredibly interesting, especially the spoken description of who Madame X is: “Madame X is a secret agent. Traveling around the world. Changing identities. Fighting for freedom. Bringing light to dark places. She is a dancer. A professor. A head of state. A housekeeper. An equestrian. A prisoner. A student. A mother. A child. A teacher. A nun. A singer. A saint. A whore. A spy in the house of love. I am Madame X." Ever the fan of bold statements and exclamations, the idea of a pseudo-conceptual record about a secret agent/anti-heroine is not something too shocking from Madonna. That’s part of why many, including myself, are fans of her work as a musician and provacitor. Even if it’s brash and ill-advised at times - she’s not afraid to do what she wants and it’s damn inspirational. The fact that, in spite of cries and sneers, she has continued making music and putting herself out there since the eighties is moving, regardless of how you feel about recent releases. So, this said, her attempt at making another career period would be an insurmountable challenge for your average person, but if anyone can do it, it’s the best selling female artist of all time. The themes on Madame X are a bit everywhere, much like everything about the record, but they make for a very interesting ride through statements from he madame herself. Political opinions (“God Control”), calls to action (“Come Alive”), religious allegory (“Batuka”), exclamations of love (“Crave”), empowerment of the disenfranchised (“Killers Who Are Partying”), the stagnation of societal evolution (“Future”), and a musical tour throughout areas such as Portugal and France are all fair game here, coming together to create a poignant experience. Despite a few lackluster lines here and there, the sum of Madonna’s messages and imagery is a wholly moving experience. Any missteps in production or lyricism fail to ruin that larger picture, one of a multifaceted, flawed, and frayed society. A society that this Madame X character wants to save, but can’t do anything beyond what one person can do. I could sit here and go through what musical points are my favorite or who produced what songs or whatever, but I feel like doing so would be a disservice to what I like about this record. It’s emotionally powerful and, frankly, bizarrely eclectic in all the right ways. The tracks here span from wrld music to discover to trap infused pop. Maybe it’s just relieving to hear a voice I respect so much touch on topics that I find myself dwelling on often in such an enjoyable way. It’s not perfect, the concept feels flustered and a bit messy at times, but it hit me in a way I hardly expected it to. It’s a hard thing to describe with a keyboard or a pen, but I guess I can put it like this: Madonna is one of my biggest heroes, hands down. I admire her courage and artistic vision immensely and both are here in spades. Before when I said that this was an attempted career period definer, I think that Madame X is that. It’s the collaboration of so many artists from so many places to assist in a pop album of a higher purpose - Madonna’s attempts to celebrate those who have been unjustly cast aside, Madonna’s attempt to promote something bigger than album sales. Maybe I’m completely off, maybe I missed the mark and this really is a confused mess (that’s how I felt the first time I heard it after all), but Madame X struck a chord with me. Take “I Rise,” a call to protest and a scream meant to be heard by those in power. That word she uses, “we,” it feels powerful, it feels inspiring. I dunno, maybe I’m a sucker, but this album made me feel something, something good. Something hopeful. https://www.sputnikmusic.com/review/79698/Madonna-Madame-X/
  19. We honor the first 20 years of music legends’ careers for the drive that elevates them from anonymity to celebrity and the vision that keeps them in flight throughout the best years. We spend the next 20 years weaponizing their own standards against them, calling each album a “radical departure” or a “return to form” or else quietly losing interest in everything but the classics. There’s more love for “Taxman” and “Drive My Car” than “Say Say Say” or “Got My Mind Set on You.” The Queen movie’s narrative ends early at Live Aid; the Elton flick calls it at “I’m Still Standing,” before things get weird in the ’80s. People want to remember their favorite figures at their best, but the miscalculations and recalibrations that happen afterward are just as integral to the story of a brilliant career as the moves made at the artist’s peak. Madonna Ciccone moved to New York City from Detroit at 20 years old in the late ’70s with a dream of making it in showbiz, be it as a dancer, a rock star, or a singer. In five years, she maneuvered through the eclectic scene at the lower-Manhattan nightclub Danceteria — which collected cool kids who didn’t make it through the door to party with the socialites and celebrities at Studio 54 — and pieced together a demo a resident DJ ran up the pipeline to the label heads who released her early singles and self-titled debut album. In ten years, Madonna was a pop star with a dozen international hit records anxiously setting her sights on a lasting film career. By year 20 of her career, she’d scored a Golden Globe for Best Actress in a Motion Picture and a New York Times best seller and topped the charts again with a studio album recounting everything she learned as a new mother and a student of Eastern mysticism and European dance music. If you’re the kind of music fan who learns by scrubbing lists of the best of things, you might see Ray of Light as the last essential Madonna album (or hang around ’til 2000’s exquisite Music, lured in by the folk-meets-Fennesz inversion of “Don’t Tell Me”), but trailing off there, you miss a world of bops, flops, and experiments Madonna pursues out of sheer tenacity and self-preservation. Trouble chased for Madonna in the first 20 years of her career; in the next 20, she found it by courting it. Where early moments of provocation — the bridal-gown romp at the 1984 VMAs the singer says was improvised when her shoe came off, the videos that were too hot for MTV, the songs about abortion and Catholic guilt — were timely commentaries on the tug-of-war in the ’80s between the brutish, horny American entertainment industry and the country’s saintly social mores, the Madonna controversies of this century seem engineered for indignant reaction. “Madonna’s priority is to keep people watching whatever she does,” Times scribe Jon Pareles wrote in a withering review of 2003’s American Life. “She maintains a presence, not a message.” (He’s not wrong about Life, but he couldn’t know that this nervous media omnipresence was where the whole pop machine was headed, that soon every release would arrive in a cloud of noise and promo.) American Life is an intriguing point of interest this summer, as Madonna has rolled out Madame X, an album (her 14th) that revisits and restructures some of the ideas floated in her fascinating Bush-era misstep. Life expanded on the folktronica crossover of Music’s “Don’t Tell Me,” incorporating acoustic and electric guitar sounds and samples into a body of downcast songs workshopped alongside French producer and Music co-conspirator Mirwais. The aim, it seems, was to speak to the state of a nation at war while reflecting the insecurities the singer experienced in the wake of the catastrophic reviews for her and then-husband Guy Ritchie’s 2002 box-office failure Swept Away. Barring the title track, whose provocative anti-war music video was pulled because Madonna worried that people would misconstrue the message, the American Life singles largely missed the “Hot 100” entirely. The album’s not without offbeat ideas — name another time one of the biggest pop stars dared to sell a four-minute song where she calls herself stupid over the lick from the Stooges’ “I Wanna Be Your Dog” — but its lasting legacy is that of a curious anti-pop downer. American Life is an intriguing point of interest this summer, as Madonna has rolled out Madame X, an album (her 14th) that revisits and restructures some of the ideas floated in her fascinating Bush-era misstep. Life expanded on the folktronica crossover of Music’s “Don’t Tell Me,” incorporating acoustic and electric guitar sounds and samples into a body of downcast songs workshopped alongside French producer and Music co-conspirator Mirwais. The aim, it seems, was to speak to the state of a nation at war while reflecting the insecurities the singer experienced in the wake of the catastrophic reviews for her and then-husband Guy Ritchie’s 2002 box-office failure Swept Away. Barring the title track, whose provocative anti-war music video was pulled because Madonna worried that people would misconstrue the message, the American Life singles largely missed the “Hot 100” entirely. The album’s not without offbeat ideas — name another time one of the biggest pop stars dared to sell a four-minute song where she calls herself stupid over the lick from the Stooges’ “I Wanna Be Your Dog” — but its lasting legacy is that of a curious anti-pop downer. Madame X finds us again at war, this time among ourselves as much as the world at large, and again, Madonna, Mirwais, and Kanye collaborator Mike Dean deliver an album about the ways the planet sucks right now and how that makes the artist feel. The songs were conceived during time spent in Portugal, where Madonna moved “to be a soccer mom,” as her son David courted schools near Lisbon. In time, she grew restless and sought out local creatives. The title of the album is an expression of the singer’s tireless pursuit of art and culture — “Madame X is a secret agent, traveling around the world, changing identities, fighting for freedom, bringing light to dark places,” she says in the prerelease trailer — and a callback to a nickname given by the influential dancer and instructor, Martha Graham. The album surveys world disorder through Madonna’s eyes, but the album gets more out of its cultural explorations than it gives back. (News items about Madonna’s comings and goings in Lisbon are a slight rejoinder to this album’s selfless messaging.) Madame X wants to be Eva Perón again, but it feels more like Carmen Sandiego. The first five songs are a world tour. Opener “Medellin” is a gorgeous, gauzy duet with Colombian reggaeton luminary Maluma. “Dark Ballet” travels in three movements from trap to classical music to an outro that sounds like robots playing Tchaikovsky’s “Nutcracker Suite,” like Wendy Carlos’s Switched-On Bach. “God Control” turns on a dime from ominous choir vocals to sleek disco, like a party after a protest. “Future” questionably pairs Quavo and reggae; “Batuka” is the kind of drum-driven call-and-response number M.I.A. and Diplo sold to the international community on Piracy Funds Terrorism 15 years ago. In spite of proclamations of solidarity in “Killers Who Are Partying” and “Extreme Occident,” Madame isn’t Madonna’s world-disorder album or even her Brazil album, as “Crave” and “Crazy” punctuate, serving up breezy trap-pop tunes back-to-back in the middle of the album. It’s an everything-but-the-kitchen-sink album in the same spirit as 2015’s unpredictable Rebel Heart, the logical conclusion for an artist who spent the last 20 years trying to figure out what sound she should and should not be making. Madonna is a shape-shifter. She shows the face the moment requires. When American Life tanked, she regrouped with Confessions on the Dance Floor, a further adventure in the sound of her first year in New York, like Frank Miller’s Caped Crusader throwback Batman: Year One. The referential, self-mythologizing Confessions was followed by a modernist overcorrection in 2008’s Hard Candy, a team-up with Pharrell, Timbaland, and Justin Timberlake that didn’t dig into how cool of a concept it could’ve been until middle-album deep cuts like “She’s Not Me” and the flawless, underrated Madonna, Pharrell, and Kanye West collaboration “Beat Goes On,” a no-brainer of a hit that never got a chance to shine as a single. 2012’s MDNA called up Ray of Light producer William Orbit again, this time to plunk the singer in the middle of a lot of fussy EDM tunes that already feel dated. Art moves quickly; Madonna works hard to keep pace. In all these twists, Madonna is trying to locate a balance between her legacy and what works on the radio, between what her fans want and what keeps the attention of the casual listener. But her sense of timing isn’t what it was. Hard Candy arrived too late in Timbaland’s decadelong hit streak to shine. The right time for the bleating synths and taut house rhythms of MDNA was the early aughts, when American audiences got wise to Daft Punk, Basement Jaxx, and the Chemical Brothers. (In the alternate universe where Madonna and Daft Punk meet and actually make records together, the underdog narrative she has fought for the last 20 years doesn’t exist.) In spite of their flaws and lofty concepts, Rebel Heart and Madame X feel more grounded than their 21st-century predecessors because the animating idea is just Madonna being Madonna. They’re true to her history in the ease of the dance-floor scorchers and in the moments of overeager cultural safari and in the uncertainty about which incarnation of the singer is going to show up from one song to the next. The records in the back catalogue might be more slick and effortless, but you still keep coming around for more, because it’s fascinating to see how her mind and music work. At 60, Madonna still has a lot to say. It makes you wonder what all she’ll get into by 80. https://www.vulture.com/2019/06/madonna-madame-x-album-review.html
  20. This isn't really a review, but more of an assessment. It ranges from tentatively positive to fairly negative to somewhere in the middle, but I think it does so in a respectful manner. The last thought really (bolded in the quote) caught my attention, but the rest of this did too. I do not at all feel the way this author does about the album or her in general, but I think this is an interesting take on Madame X. After the Pitchfork travesty, I'm glad to see that people are still capable of being critical without being rude.
  21. Madonna’s new album “Madame X,” released Friday, is many things — an alter ego, a love letter to Portugal, a multicultural musical patch work, a wild and daring musical experiment and also her best effort since “Confessions on a Dance Floor” (2005). “Madame X is a secret agent,” she says. “Traveling around the world. Changing identities. Fighting for freedom. Bringing light to dark places. She is a dancer. A professor. A head of state. A housekeeper. An equestrian. A prisoner. A student. A mother. A child. A teacher. A nun. A singer. A saint. A whore. A spy in the house of love.” The nickname was given to her by famed dance instructor Martha Graham, who was her teacher at 19, because she would come to class each day with a different identity. Clearly that moniker stuck with Madonna and through Madame X, she remains a creative force with something to say. The opening track is the Latin-infused “Medellin” featuring Colombian rapper Maluma. When compared to the other offerings on the album, this comes off as one of the weaker tracks. Why this was released as the lead single is as big a mystery as to why Madonna has chosen to wear a diamond-encrusted eye patch as high fashion. But since it’s been a national pastime to question or criticize Madonna’s choices, fans have learned to buckle up and weather the ride with her, for better or worse. Perhaps it’s fitting that she sings “Let’s take a trip” in this opener because that is exactly what’s in store. As the “cha-cha-cha” of Medellin fades into the bleak start of “Dark Ballet,” Madonna sings with forceful confidence about how she can dress like a boy and dress like a girl and, ironically, how our world is “obsessed with fame.” It then takes an abrupt left turn into a cascading piano solo that spills right into an electronic rendition of Tchaikovsky’s “Nutcracker Suite.” Where is this going? Her bizarre tongue-in-cheek declamation midway through asks, “Can’t you hear outside of your Supreme hoodie, the wind that’s beginning to howl?” We’re not done. It then make a swift U-turn back to the original composition and quietly ends with Madonna imitating the wind by repeatedly blowing air from her lips because “the storm isn’t in the air, it’s inside of us.” Provocative pop art brilliance or extreme hot mess? Whatever it is, the song (and accompanying music video) is a bold statement of extreme artistic expression unprecedented by Madonna and is the first of several standout tracks. Much like “Dark Ballet,” “God Control” starts off slow, but soon switches gears with colorful twists and turns before coming to an exhilarating end.This is arguably the best track on the album. “Everybody knows the damn truth/Our nation lied and lost respect,” Madonna sings through gritted teeth (or was she just wearing her grills?) and “I think I understand why people get a gun/I think I understand why we all give up.” While no stranger to political commentary on past projects, the stark frankness in these lyrics make the statements from “American Life” sound like “Like a Virgin.” When it breaks into a church choir singing “We lost God control,” a breath can barely be caught before jumping into an infectious swirling disco beat perfectly fit for dance floor consumption, all while Madonna repeatedly urges us to “wake up.” When she whispers, “everybody knows the damn truth,” it sounds incredibly similar to her 2001 club hit “Impressive Instant” from “Music.” These elements successfully blend together to produce her best dance track since “Hung Up.” If “Music” and “American Life” had a baby with “Confessions on a Dance Floor” as its stepmother, it would be the mid-tempo treasure “I Don’t Search I Find.” There are strong references to her 1991 single “Rescue Me” due to carefully placed finger snaps and assertive spoken-word verses during the bridge before exclamations of “Finally enough love.” The comparisons to her earlier albums are easily made due to the heavy presence of Mirwais Ahmadzai, who produced and co-wrote six tracks on “Madame X,” five tracks “Music,” and virtually everything on “American Life,” which makes “Madame X” feel like the third entry in an album trilogy. “Crave” (with Swae Lee) is the most radio friendly of the pack, which is why it is currently climbing Billboard’s Adult Contemporary chart. Unlike “Medellin,” where Maluma’s solo parts dominate, the contributions of Swae Lee are evenly placed and end up as the best vocal collaboration on the album. “Crazy” is the unexpected earworm of “Madame X.” When, if ever, have you heard an accordion in a pop song outside of a Weird Al parody? The chorus pounds into your head in a good way and at one point Madonna sings “I bent my knees for your like a prayer” which is not the only “Like a Prayer” nod within this album. “Batuka” and “Faz Gostoso” are the most notable examples of the influence Portugal has injected into Madonna since she moved to Lisbon early last year. With thundering drums and an eclectic mix of instruments and voices courtesy of Afro-Portuguese group Orquestra de Batukadeiras, “Batuka” comes off like a fabulous jam session. Madonna sings “Get that old man/Put him in a jail.” Is she talking about Trump? One can only assume as much. “Faz Gostoso,” which in Portuguese translates to “makes delicious,” features Brazilian singer Anitta. It is not quite as good as “Batuka,” but still fun. While nothing completely falls flat, there are some tracks that don’t shine as brightly as others. “Bitch I’m Loca” (not to be confused with “Rebel Heart’s” “Bitch I’m Madonna”) is the first that comes to mind. Did we really need another flirty collaboration with Maluma? The reggae-drenched “Future” (released as a promotional single last month) has Madonna trading verses with American rapper Quavo. While not entirely out of place nor as unnecessary as “Bitch I’m Loca,” it remains a shadow to the light of the other tracks surrounding it. “Killers Who Are Partying” enters martyrdom territory with lyrics like “I will be gay if the gay are burned” and “I will be Islam if Islam is hated.” It goes on and on, ending with “I’ll be a woman if she is raped and her heart is breaking.” The empowering album closer “I Rise” was, in Madonna’s own words, written “as a way of giving a voice to all marginalized people who feel they don’t have the opportunity to speak their mind. This year is the 50th anniversary of Pride and I hope this song encourages all individuals to be who they are, to speak their minds and to love themselves.” Not without political commentary, the track opens with the voice of Parkland school shooting survivor Emma Gonzalez. The deluxe edition includes bonus tracks “Looking for Mercy” and “Extreme Occident,” while the deluxe box set further includes “Funana”, “Back That Up to the Beat”, and “Ciao Bella,” The most interesting of the bonus tracks is “Funana” where late icons Whitney Houston, George Michael, Prince, and Aretha Franklin (among others) are name dropped in a “Vogue”-style memoriam.
  22. On June 14, the perennial "Queen of Pop" Madonna released her latest studio offering, the highly-anticipated "Madame X." The deluxe version of the album opens with "Medellín," her catchy collaboration with Maluma, and it is followed by the crisp downtempo tune "Dark Ballet," as well as the hypnotic "God Control." "Future" with Quavo is more nonchalant and mellow, and it immediately breaks into "Batuka" and the unflinching "Killers Who Are Partying." "Extreme Occident" is a piano-driven ballad and "Come Alive" is indeed vibrant and refreshing. Malume is featured yet again on this album with "Bitch I'm Loca," while Brazilian music sensation Anitta collaborates with the pop queen on "Faz Gostoso." After the upbeat and smooth "I Don't Search I Find," it closes with "Looking for Mercy" and on an uplifting note with the inspirational "I Rise." Madame X is available on iTunes and on Spotify. The Verdict Overall, Madonna delivers on her new studio album, Madame X, which she manages to keep fresh and exciting. It is comprised of multiple neat multicultural sounds, which makes it even more appealing and diverse for her listening audience. Madame X garners 4.5 out of 5 stars. To learn more about Madonna and her new album Madame X, check out her official website. Read more: http://www.digitaljournal.com/entertainment/music/review-madonna-releases-stunning-new-pop-album-madame-x/article/552182#ixzz5r78Asvj3
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