Jump to content

Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'Review'.



More search options

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Forums

  • FOTP Faves
    • Ariana Grande
    • Beyoncé
    • Britney Spears
    • Christina Aguilera
    • Katy Perry
    • Lady Gaga
    • Lana Del Rey
    • Madonna
    • Mariah Carey
    • Rihanna
    • Taylor Swift
    • Spotlight
  • Music - General
    • Music News & Discussion
    • K-Pop / J-Pop
    • Other Music
    • Battlegrounds
  • General
    • World News & Discussion
    • Celebrity News & Discussion
    • Entertainment News & Discussion
    • Games & Competitions

Blogs

  • #MintBLOGS
  • Hylia ha blog
  • The easiest way to get to my bussY
  • #AnTidiARy
  • Desnudate's Quest for Love
  • Legendary Bloggers, blogging underneath the blood orange sun.
  • Memoirs of a Troublesome Teenager
  • Music.
  • Rico's Remixes and Edits
  • Gabe's corner.
  • This Is My Blog
  • Slaying with the blogs.
  • my music blog
  • Reviews by BLUE.
  • "Diary of a Twinky Kid" - for heterosexual eyes only!
  • Haus of Whores Jr.
  • The Diary of Sylk
  • I got 99 Problems, but a Book ain't one!
  • The Wonderful World of Pokemon
  • Entea's Personal Charts
  • My Bops/Recommendations
  • Under construction
  • badgaldora #CONFESSiONS
  • Mystique his thoughts
  • SYLK Reviews
  • RNDOM
  • The Things That Dreams Are Made Of ...
  • Choosey Chooses
  • Life With Harley
  • BlankReviews
  • #MusicCorner
  • My Favorite Albums
  • Kevin's 'Little Bit of Everything'
  • Pom Pom
  • In the Mind of Brice
  • Everybody's A Critic
  • FOTP: The Emotes
  • Josh's Album Review Blog
  • No Longer Available
  • Justice's Reviews
  • Marnie's Throwback Charts
  • The Wendy Museum
  • Seanika's Ramblings
  • M3LL155X's Music Blog
  • ANDREVIEWS™
  • TalkAboutTunes
  • anna-wa
  • The Goddess Speaks
  • CAL RESOURCES
  • Last.fm Chart Overview History
  • Grande Blogs!
  • With Love
  • Reviews
  • The Locker Room
  • Cunticritic™
  • Stansalot's Life Experiences
  • No Longer Available
  • Sylk - Pop Industry Archive
  • #PopIndustry: Hyunty's Archives
  • Luca's Library
  • ??
  • Queefing and not being normal: A music blog by Shiver
  • Slay's Monthly Vinyls
  • Barbiej33p Horror
  • You Can't Say Happiness Without Penis - The Hylia Memoirs
  • Views from the Skyline
  • The Hannah Broadcasting Company
  • No Longer Available
  • Put Inspirational Title Here
  • A Series of Insanely Boring Events
  • Impossible Life
  • d
  • It Smells Rank In Here
  • SYLK STORIES
  • Idk
  • Addi's Top Flops
  • Uncreative Blog Title!
  • Monster's FOTP Faves Megarate Database
  • Addi Rants
  • What's The Wave?
  • ¯ \_(ツ)_/¯
  • DramaReviews
  • H.O.N.E.Y's Love Corner
  • Dear Skorpio Magazine.
  • Confessions of a Teenage Homo
  • Spotlight
  • My CD Collection
  • [redacted]
  • But Here's My Blog, So Read It Maybe
  • dear god why
  • LanaxGaga Reviews - Episode 1 [Joanne]
  • LanaxGaga Reviews
  • Reincarnation Locations
  • No Longer Available
  • The Crazy Little Ramblings of My Parents
  • No Longer Available
  • A Poem
  • Marnie's Gifs
  • No Longer Available
  • TattooedHeart: Chatty Woman
  • Winnie's Guide To Proper Self Help And Spiritual Guidance
  • Spilling Tea
  • julia's world
  • Tea of the day featuring LanaxGaga
  • My Own Private Hell
  • Man of the Day
  • Blood & Magic: The Reincarnation Story [A Mini Online Novel]
  • The warmthest cord of care.
  • Memoirs of an Irrelevant
  • Lum's Top 50 Songs of 2016
  • My crush story
  • sonowgoodbye's Physical Music Collection
  • H.O.N.E.Y's Diary
  • #VISUALALBUMS
  • i dont want to live with it anymore
  • The Secret Underground Stash of Gifs
  • #SolREVIEWS - Kylie's Other Bits & Pieces
  • Late Night Thoughts with Bri
  • Slither Productions
  • #CosmicREVIEWS
  • Derrik's Paradise of Pop Reviews
  • Derrik's Paradise of Pop Reviews
  • #MusicCHARTS
  • Hermione's Original Episodic Series
  • My CD Collection
  • [redacted]
  • Pensamientos
  • My Life As Royalty
  • ?
  • #CosmicBLOGS
  • A Blog of Divinity: Moonflower
  • #CosmicCOLLECTS
  • My Listening Threads
  • Halcyon's Graphics
  • BBQ's Marination Station
  • #VulnicuraLISTENSto
  • #MarajRANTS
  • Unwanted Opinions™
  • Kuba's Blog
  • Sonic September: A Month of Music Reviews by Ghost
  • LittleDude's Corner
  • Collection
  • Thoughts
  • TAG4LIFE
  • TAG4LIFE
  • TAG4LIFE
  • TAG4LIFE
  • Shitty Content, Shitty Creator
  • Viral News In USA
  • Dear Diary.
  • Hyunty Broadcasting Office
  • Haus of Whores Jr.
  • SWINΞ‘s Thoughts
  • Where Does He Get Those Wonderful Toys?...
  • ART-POP
  • wat
  • My Favorite Music of 2017
  • Count Olaf's Charts
  • My Blog and Stuff
  • Ultraviolence
  • #FOTPMOVIECLUB
  • I love this site!
  • LeaHeartBroken's Music World
  • The Velvet Rope
  • Savage thots
  • Physical: Closer to the Truth
  • Songs/Reviews/Opinions
  • My Favorite
  • Under Construction
  • A Few Andrew Thoughts
  • Screaming into the void
  • My Projects
  • When Life Deals Us Cards
  • COME GET YOUR SONGWRITING CREDIT RECEIPTS FOR BG
  • .
  • Venom's Blog
  • House of the Undying
  • Summer Songs
  • barbie ferreira's album reviews.
  • My Thoughts at Present.

Find results in...

Find results that contain...


Date Created

  • Start

    End


Last Updated

  • Start

    End


Filter by number of...

Joined

  • Start

    End


Group


Found 600 results

  1. LittleDudeNT5

    Is "Blackout" Britney's Best Album?

    Blackout has perhaps become Britney’s most lauded album among fans and retrospective pop music critics. This is rather significant considering its relatively low impact at the time. The music had taken a backseat to Britney’s media attention and tabloid coverage. The critics were more concerned with her awkward pole-dancing in the “Gimme More” music video or her lip-synced fumbling performance at the MTV Video Music Awards. The album remains a black sheep among her discography, which sees Britney completely embracing the underground genres of dark electro-pop, techno, and even dubstep (all of which became more popular in later years). It didn’t offer the type of bubbly personality, sensuality, or radio-friendly hits we’d come to expect from a Britney album. This was what made it such an outlier – not just for Britney, but for the pop music landscape. Blackout is arguably Britney’s most cohesive album; the soundscape is succinct and each track brings its own level of satisfaction for the overall listening experience. However, despite this praise, it’s difficult to name Blackout as the best Britney album. The project is decidedly impersonal. Beyond a few softer tracks – like “Heaven on Earth” and “Why Do I Feel Sad” – the album is aggressively and unabashedly sexual. In The Zone had offered tracks oozing intimacy with a slice of passion: Britney whispered soft desires in “Breathe on Me” and easy sultriness over oriental strings on “Touch of my Hand”. Blackout hits listeners with gritty, hard-edge beats, forward lyrics of uncommitted erotic encounters, and a fair amount of vocals from the male producers that make you feel like a sweaty guy is breathing down your neck at a club. In fact, the entire albums feels like strobe-lights in a crowded black-box club, black paint on the walls and floors, and graffiti all over the bathroom stalls. The room is spinning, it’s dark, and there are people grinding on you from all sides. In some ways I suppose that was the intention of this album: it was meant for the clubs. On In The Zone, Britney co-wrote eight of the tracks. These were oftentimes specific to her experiences or interests. In 2005, fans were seeing Britney becoming more and more involved in the creative process, and were even promised the most personal project of her career. Whatever work was done between 2004 and 2007 was seemingly scrapped (with only a few Britney-penned tracks surviving on an EP) and the public received Blackout instead. Britney barely contributed to two of the tracks on the album, and considering her private struggles, the media scrutinizing her behavior, and being pregnant during recording, it’s hard to find the artist’s personal connection to the music. Britney only performed once to promote the album, and was focused instead on her own trials and tribulations. Considering what was going on with her at the time, a raw, sexually-charged record is an odd professional move. That isn’t to say that Britney isn’t present on the album. Despite criticisms of over-reliance on autotune, Britney is direct, loud, and sassy on Blackout, giving more than a few memorable performances. An album doesn’t necessarily need to come from a personal place to be good. Blackout is sonically interesting and one of the most provocative pop albums of the 2000s. Other female pop singers of the time couldn’t quite pull off this type of image and embracement of underground pop subgenres as Britney did. It remains a solid, timeless album even after all these years. One of the reasons why Blackout can’t quite snag the title of Britney’s best album is because of the releases that bookend it. In the Zone saw Britney’s intentionally-charged blossom out of her teen-pop image and into womanhood and creative metamorphosis. The album doesn’t quite hit you from all sides, as there are a few tracks that could have been replaced by any number of excellent unreleased material, but it saw Britney at her most involved. It was refreshing to see her finally take control of her music. On the other end, Britney barely gave Blackout enough time to rest in the dirt before releasing Circus in 2008. Although Britney still wasn’t giving much creative input, the album has a better balance in tone. The album is more positive, brighter, and doesn’t preoccupy itself with the subject of sex. The album is full of certified hits (“Womanizer”, “Circus”, “If U Seek Amy”) and even more potential smashes (“Kill the Lights”, “Shattered Glass”, “Unusual You”). Circus saw Britney re-embracing Top 40 sensibilities, but unlike the bubblegum releases of her youth, this album is mature and competent. One can’t quite say whether or not In the Zone or Circus are Britney’s best efforts – just as it can’t be said with certainty that Blackout takes that crown. All three are highly formidable pop albums in their own right, and it all depends on what the listener wants from Britney Spears as an artist.
  2. Finally I'm moving it here! Here's my first ever entry for the #TamaReviews series. Check it out! REVAMPED! “Bionic” is the title of Christina Aguilera’s sixth studio album—fifth counting only English language releases, fourth excluding the Spanish language and the holiday albums—which was released on June 4th-11th 2010, depended on your country. It is the follow-up to Aguilera’s previous album, “Back to Basics”. “Bionic” served as a reinvention of Aguilera’s music, persona, and career trajectory moving forward in time. Aguilera, known as one of the leading ladies of big-voiced pop singing since the early Noughts, is famously recognized as the artsy student of pop music compared to her peers. Rather than Britney Spears’s safe but energetic dance pop songs, Aguilera would make trials of different mixture of sounds and genres as she seemed to be unafraid of neither imperfections nor errors—despite being a self-proclaimed “perfectionist”. Compared to Jessica Simpson’s similar big-voiced brand, Aguilera always seemed to make exciting innovations in her music that Simpson could never dare to try. Therefore it is fascinating to witness the evolution of Aguilera’s music; started with an R&B/Soul-inspired eponymous debut album which then followed by a similar sounding Spanish language release, a Christmas album, a mixture of both the Noughts favorite sounds as well as retro moments on “Stripped”, and later blossomed to the previously mentioned “Back to Basics” which was an album filled with more R&B/Soul music alongside sophisticated Jazz that took inspirations from American popular music 30+ years ago. However, it was not enough for Aguilera as she sat and pondered inside the recording studio. “I wonder what should I do next? What is next? Next is...the future!” she thought. She prepared a rocket ship and launched herself to an unknown future to get inspired by it. Later, as she orbited back to Earth, a huge smile could be seen upon her face as she thought, “I am the future.” Then, we arrived here. Opened with a bombastic track, aptly titled “Bionic” as the titular track, Aguilera promised to take every listeners headfirst to the future as she proclaimed, “Bionic, take ya supersonic, eh!” You might get migraines or became insane, got hit by her rocket ship and felt as time slipped, or went up in a hurricane and got lost there, but she did not care about that. She didn’t care about your thoughts or your screams, she would take you through this journey until the very end. As she sang to you that she’s not herself tonight, you would get the sense of danger as much as arousal. Aguilera took notice of that and followed with “Woohoo”, a flirty song that featured then-rookie Nicki Minaj to co-pilot for a few minutes. It was a call for celebration of lust, love, and fire as it basked in the glorious fab of an elite club’s neon lights. During the song Aguilera repeatedly told you “guys” a direct command; to dance below her and taste her “woohoo!” Similar to this is a song titled “My Girls” which featured a band named Le Tigre in production and a rapper named Peaches. Aguilera let listeners know that she’s having fun with her girls and that they are not afraid of anything as they stick together to take control. Despite the sexual nature of the album’s content, there was also a sense of doom and urgency loomed on the tracklisting. Particularly on a song titled “Lift Me Up”, which was written by longtime collaborator Linda Perry, you could hear the eagerness to express herself without judgment because something troubling had happened. As Aguilera also stated on "Prima Donna", she had worked hard in a long week and needed a couple drinks to ease herself. The chorus told you repeatedly that she is a prima-donna, and you truly did believe her. A specific part of the album which Aguilera herself had stated as “the heart of Bionic” proceeded to tell listeners about her thoughts other than sex. Co-penned with Sia and Sam Dixon, the sadness was real and present. “All I Need” and “I Am” explained the joy and the expectation, accumulating to a brief moment of hope until “You Lost Me” hit you—or rather, her—hard on the face. Aguilera sang in much anguish as she lamented loss; a forlorn protagonist who had to suffer the most as she delivered one of the best vocal performances of her career. The album resembled a riddle that Aguilera demanded us to solve. “There must be a cause to all of this, have you noticed?” she spoke in your mind. She might not be around you, but through all of these songs she has never made her presence any clearer. Listeners would take their time to analyze the tragedy that she told, or maybe feel some sarcasm as she scolded, but for every songs like “Glam”—a nice song about the joy of fashion as a freedom of expression—or “Not Myself Tonight”—a feelgood tell-all about something that’s gonna happen “tonight”—there is also an “Elastic Love” which told us about behind-the-scene and more. Perhaps the most thrilling moments of the record could be found on the deluxe side. There are five other songs that didn’t make the standard version tracklisting. “Monday Morning” opened the deluxe disc with an effervescent quality that nobody could avoid, while “Bobblehead” would make you giggle and wondered about the identity of the song’s subject as you did vogue. There is also a piece-of-art titled “Birds of Prey”—unrelated to DC’s infamous fictional villains group—that would strike listeners with its electrifying electronica as well as the lyrical work which told about danger and disappointment of a superstar’s circle of connections. There are also a stripped version of “I Am” which sounded gorgeous and an overwrought ballad titled “Stronger Than Ever”. However, the album would not necessarily end there. The last track, “Little Dreamer”, gave you the very final moment which closed the story beautifully in a mix of both bitter and sweet. There was a familiar feeling of happiness that would make you cry as the music was going to an end, and you couldn’t stop yourself from saying, “Yes, thank you so much!” to an imaginary Aguilera in your mind who smiled at you. “It is done, I have accomplished.” she said to you before walking away, tears of joy were also streaming down her beautiful face. Overall, “Bionic” is a highly recommended record for those who wanted to listen to the kind of pop music that didn’t sound bland or formless, but it would not necessarily abandon the fans of the chanteuse either. It might have been a product that had made a lot of people scratch their heads in 2010, but not ten years later. “Bionic” has never felt more at home in month June, year 2020. ----FIN---- That's it everyone. Hope you can spare a bit of your time to read this review. Love, Tama.
  3. I'm back, people. Not that you would care but Hey Hey Hey.mp3 This time, it's Witness time! REVAMPED! Katy Perry released her fifth studio album titled “Witness” on June 9th 2017 to a rather underwhelming reception from both the critics and general public. It was supposed to be a reintroduction slash reinvention of Perry’s music and public persona after the overwhelming success of her previous album, “PRISM”. Initially, Perry had introduced a concept which she termed as “purposeful pop” for the album and had stated that it would show the “real” her that had never been exposed to the general public who have had great leisure time listening to Katy Perry’s music before. Katheryn Elizabeth Hudson—actual name of Perry—is a daughter of born-again Christian parents and once was a contemporary Christian singer herself before broke through mainstream recognition with her explicitly secular music in 2008. This is an important factor for Perry’s career as her religious root would be the first thing that listeners found on the opening track of “Witness”. The titular track introduced itself to us in a rather subdued fashion in contrast to Perry’s usual first track of her albums. “Witness” certainly sounded way more controlled and intimate compared to the bombast of “Roar” or the potency that “Teenage Dream” possessed. Perhaps lyrically resembled more of the curiosity presented on “One of the Boys” without emulating its eager Rock foundation, “Witness” served as a pleasant surprise in Perry’s discography. The surprise didn’t necessarily end there as “Hey Hey Hey” and “Roulette” continued the journey toward Perry’s real world with a strong confidence. Listeners would be entertained by the wit that Perry presented through the lyrics of these songs, especially compared to her previous music which had only got to show a small percentage of intelligence in favor of heavy sex appeal. This is not to say that sex appeal has been erased from Perry’s music, especially within songs like “Tsunami” and “Bon Appétit” which presented themselves as erotica. Theme of empowerment also ran through “Power”, with lyrics such as “I am my mother’s daughter / And there are so many things I love about her / But I have, I have to break the cycle / So I can sit first at the dinner table” aimed to liberate herself and listeners out of a difficult situation. Perry described her intention was caused by something bigger than her (“Bigger Than Me), along with an urgency to make change amidst common ignorance that permeated the world (“Chained to the Rhythm”). However, this didn’t really happen without a personal conflict, as Perry sang on “Mind Maze” about her mind resembling a maze that often confused her and made her unable to move forward. Autobiographical songs such as “Miss You More” and “Save as Draft” became the bleeding heart of “Witness” while “Chained to the Rhythm” and “Pendulum” worked as the logic that ruled. The entirety of the album would make sense once listeners found their way to sit patiently and listen wholeheartedly to Perry’s words. This condition separated “Witness” from her other albums—and for once in her lifetime, she had finally made a body of work that's worth to be appreciated not just as another product for consumerism, but perhaps as a collection of fascinating art pieces which evoked true intimacy. ----FIN---- That's it everyone. Hope you can spare a bit of your time to read this review. Love, Tama.
  4. The 20 highest rated by Metacritic score The 20 highest by user score The 20 lowest by Metacritic score The 20 lowest by user score Source: https://www.metacritic.com/browse/albums/score/metascore/year/filtered?sort=desc&view=detailed N.B.: The lists are for reviews from January 1, 2020-June 13, 2020. As the year continues the lists are subjected to changes.
  5. Welcome! Another day, another review! Nobody asked, but here I am! Today I'm reviewing this iconic AND legendary album. Critics didn't like the album all that much, but KatyCats will always praise this album to eternity. The rest is remarkable historical achievements. What do I think of this album? Let's find out! 1. Teenage Dream - The fact that she begins the album with a titular track THIS GOOD will always amaze me. It perfectly introduces listeners to the overall sound of the album and I am absolutely impressed with this. Her singing is also really good here, the fact that she began with falsetto and gradually reaches some high belts. Very good! - 4 stars out of 5. 2. Last Friday Night (T.G.I.F.) - Yes, this song is really good. It's a fun jam. Its lyrics are clever and adorable yet cringe and provocative at the same time. I don't know how she managed to create something this complex, must be The Doctor touch . That sax will always decimate my existence. - 4 stars out of 5. 3. California Gurls (feat. Snoop Dogg) - Come on perfection! This one is automatically better than the previous songs, but I swear I will always love you title track! The rapper contributes a whole lot to elevate the song to an even higher level, and the song is already on a high level. This song is just WOW! - 5 stars out of 5. 4. Firework - Alert! A bit of a let down. However, it is a very fun anthem about becoming confident in your own skin, so that's really nice. The "boom boom boom brighter than the moon" somewhat-of-a-hook is also nice and goes along with the positive message of the song. Overall, it's good. - 4 stars out of 5. 5. Peacock - At first I was like what the fuck, then I keep listening and damn Katy for making such an addictive chorus . The bridge is cringe but also hilarious. The singing is quite creative especially at the very end with that "I wanna see ya!" Yet again another perplexing song from her. - 2 stars out of 5. 6. Circle the Drain - This one is very fascinating. It's rock but still done in a glittery pop way. That "but you fucking CHO-O-O-OKED!" is amazing. I don't care about the Bionic-inspired bridge because it doesn't go well with the other parts. However, I like that last minute. - 3 stars out of 5. 7. The One That Got Away - Yes. - 5 stars out of 5. 8. E.T. - Come on Bionic woman! WE WILL WE WILL ROCK YOU! In all seriousness, I don't love this song. Not at all. The chorus is far too spacious yet rowdy at the same fucking time. Maybe she's onto something though when she released the Kanye-assisted version as a single because this is pretty much a hip-hop song. It's alright. - 3 stars out of 5. 9. Who Am I Living For? - Her religious moment. It's a nice moment. This is definitely the oddest song from the bunch; the original Hey Hey Hey. I adore the singing though, it's very bold. - 4 stars out of 5. 10. Pearl - That production is really good. Her singing is really lovely. The lyrics are very inspirational albeit become a bit silly at the end. I often cried to this song. - 5 stars out of 5. 11. Hummingbird Heartbeat - My God, Katy...I know that we can get very horny but this song is not good. It's mediocre at best as it tries to emulate the sound of the title track but fails miserably. Luckily, her voice is really good on this song despite being quite detached. It's the worst song of the album. - 2 stars out of 5. 12. Not Like the Movies - She really saved the best for last , yeah? Come on Katy, drag Snow White away by her headband! This song is so soft, so delicate yet the lyrics are very bold. I love it. It's really great. - 5 stars out of 5. In conclusion, this album is one of the most important musical projects in the history. She is the first woman to achieve FIVE number one hits from one album on the Billboard main singles chart. That is super impressive! The music ranges from catchy pop tunes to slight autobiographical works. It's not perfect, but it sure does contain some near perfect pop tunes. Courtesy of Dr. Luke and Max Martin AND Bonnie McKee, yes, but Katy's lyrical contribution and final say must definitely be the most important thing here. It's also quite rare for an album to produce such massive impact like this album had made. Her legacy will truly live on and on forever! So, there you have it. Let me know your thoughts about this album. Remember, it's all just opinions. Yours and mine. Let's celebrate life by listening/streaming this gorgeous album! Love, Tama.
  6. Hello everyone, this review has been moved and revamped to my blog section. Let's celebrate life by doing kind acts to as many people as you can reach, and stay healthy! Listen/stream Witness too! Love, Tama.
  7. You can see the review here.
  8. By Adria Young Back in 2006, when Victoria song-bird Nelly Furtado released the heavily Timbaland-produced Loose, the media went fucking bananas over Furtado’s drastic thrust into hip-hop-styled sexuality, especially because the Internet of the mid-2000s resembles its current sad state: an open cesspool of garbage bags who piss-moan about anything that doesn’t conform to their fedora-capped views of women. When Loose’s second single “Promiscuous” started its 24-hour rotations across Canada, Furtado was immediately and notably one of the first Canadian artists to experience public slut-shaming. This is a complicated discussion because women in entertainment have always been slut-shamed. No, women everywhere have always been slut-shamed and it’s usually based on archaic, conservative double-standards that still permeate North American culture and MRA websites. The simple catalyst is the outdated ideology that women are whores or virgins, good or bad. Men can enjoy a masculine form of sexuality via unlimited conquest, but female sexuality outside of a male-profiting power structure means bullshit moralizing on the woman expressing it, by men and women alike. In this construction, it means there’s no room for women to be sexual for themselves nor is there room for female agency. So when Furtado released Loose, shit hit the misogynistic fan. First of all, what kind of title was Loose? After two wholesome albums, Whoa Nelly! and Folklore, Loose was targeted as some kind of pro-slut super-whore manifesto. Even before the album dropped, criticism swirled around Furtado’s “sexy” promo photos. And this was 2006! Like … Despite the impressive list of established producers, the three years of craft in Los Angeles and Miami, collaboration with Pharrell, Lil Wayne, Swollen Members, K’naan, a Spanish-sung track and the goddamn-amazing Hall & Oates club-jam, “Maneater”, Furtado had to strongly defend her art to a public that refused to accept a woman’s embrace and celebration of her own sexuality. Her hard work and creative energy was reduced to her appearance on the album cover. The media also focused on bullshit like the kind of “example” she was setting, the “tarting up” of a Canadian good-girl, romantic relationships between her and producers, her sexual orientation, her clothing, her “midriff” and all kinds of superficial, sexist crap that had nothing to do with her music, what her music meant or what strength it might give to other women struggling with the very same gender dichotomies and double-standards around sexuality that the album was trying to explore. Reviewers (one who called her previous albums “hand-jobs”) were befuddled by this “sexed up dance record.” Can you name a dance-record that isn’t “sexed-up”? I recently watched Usher dry-humping a fan. Isn’t that “sexed up?” Isn’t that assault? For a history of how men exploit sexuality without criticism, see: everything. But a woman who ventured into a new genre and dared to grow as an artist? And with themes for mature audiences presented in unique, refreshing (if maybe predictable) ways? Furtado’s transition from radio-friendly folk-pop to working with world-class rap producers on a cohesively themed hip-hop dance-album seemed, more than anything, cool as fuck! On top of that, as Furtado said herself, this album was about becoming a woman. And women are confident. And confidence is sexy. The threat inherent in Furtado’s album – in her desire to be herself, and portray herself as she wished to be seen – was that women could actually own their sexuality, that female sexuality exists outside of male gratification and that men don’t have power to grant it. Then they said, think of the children! Shield them from the midriffs! It’s embarrassing to think that this kind of social puritanism existed in 2006, and that it still exists. And yet, women continue to express sexuality in their own artistic ways. 2014 was the year of big beautiful asses! I mean, looking back, Loose isn’t even that sexually gratuitous. But some MRA douche might ask, did Furtado help contribute to a hyper sexualized culture in which Miley Cyrus could grind on a gross old man, a culture in which women are whores with abandon but now they’re socially empowered to do so? Nope. And that’s a dumb fucking question. Just tuck your penis in and treat artists as artists, and maybe explore gender-identity if it’s relevant. It’s that simple. The great flip-side is that Loose was a huge commercial success around the world, especially in countries that have strong dance and electronic scenes. It was a banger, even though Canadian media threw conservative shade at Furtado, which really only exposed the gender biases of reporters in that media. Overall, Loose had some inconsistent moments but it was carefully well-produced, showed a range of creative experimentation for both Furtado and Timbaland, had feminine sexual agency, a dominant female-favoured perspective and most of all, it was trend-oriented pop music. Timbaland shouldn’t go uncredited. In “Promiscuous,” she teases him and panders to slutty, coquettish stereotypes. But it’s funny since some of the power that comes from using sexuality is the recognition that it’s being used at all. And Timbo and Furtado don’t actually fuck in the song. It’s a verbal dance; it’s a dance album. Thoroughly examined, Loose should have been way more risqué for all that criticism. I can’t even find a way to justify it. The reaction was a critical example of unfair public moralizing and silencing of female artistry. She had already addressed this phenomenon in her 2003 hit, “Powerless.” On Loose, she just got louder with an alternative, non-traditional voice and image for women to prioritize themselves.
  9. https://www.metacritic.com/music/chromatica/lady-gaga?ref=hp Clash Music - 80 Across its sixteen tracks, ‘Chromatica’ is entirely over-the-top, but in the best possible way. Every song is an anthem of defiance and empowerment, turned up to 11 and genetically engineered for maximum danceability. https://clashmusic.com/reviews/lady-gaga-chromatica The A.V. Club - 75 “Enigma” really is a fitting word for Gaga. Her choices can be puzzling, and not every song is a success, but that unpredictability is what makes her exciting and leaves us coming back for more. So maybe Gaga doesn’t know who she truly is yet. It’s still enjoyable to watch her figure it out. https://music.avclub.com/lady-gaga-returns-to-her-electro-pop-roots-and-channels-1843743622 The Irish Times - 80 musicOMH.com - 80 The Guardian 80 NME - 80 Sputnik - 60 other reviews (non MC) very positive, Billboard Magazine Part of the reason why Little Monsters have longed for this moment is because Gaga’s propulsive early singles, from “Just Dance” to “Bad Romance” to “Poker Face,” often captured an unadulterated feeling of bliss, a base thrill that pop diehards long to experience. With Chromatica, Gaga has offered that elixir -- a summer dance-pop escape of the highest quality -- at a time when we could use as many shots of it as possible. 7/10, Riot Magazine The record is Back To The Future-meets-Mad Max-meets-Barbarella, creating an interesting dichotomy of sounds that’s both futuristic and retro. Filled with infectious dance tracks, disco and sci-fi elements, brought together against a pumping bassline, Gaga has restored our faith in pop music and has us wishing we could live on the fictional planet of Chromatica. It’s been a while since we’ve seen “classic Gaga” — eccentric, bold, and daring. The very woman who dared to wear a meat dress and produced feel-good anthems like ‘Born This Way.’ Thankfully, she’s created a record filled with electro-pop deliciousness. very positive, USA Today Lady Gaga's euphoric dance-pop return is her best album in a decade. Unlike 2013's "Artpop," a misunderstood misfire with similarly lofty ambitions, "Chromatica" delivers on its energetic, empowering concept, making it Mother Monster's catchiest and most cohesive body of work since 2011's hit-spawning "Born This Way." very positive, Yahoo! Her absolute banger of a sixth studio album, Chromatica, marks her triumphant and trippy return to disco-stick-wielding, poker-faced, bad-romancing electropop. But Chromatica isn’t exactly a flashback to Gaga’s The Fame era — it goes deeper and flashes farther back than that. very positive, Attitude Magazine Chromatica is an album of unabashed floor-fillers, the lyrical and melodic idiosyncracies contained within are undeniably, admirably, Gaga. After experimenting with her public image over the last few years, Chromatica proves that Gaga the pop star is still at her best when carving out a cathartic, inclusive disco for her legions of of Little Monsters. 4/5 stars, Standard UK The thudding house beats are relentless, the electronic sounds are proudly maximalist and Gaga uses the guttural end of her wide vocal range to summon Nineties dance divas. Stripped of the pretensions of her third album, Artpop, and the Meat Loaf influences of her second, Born This Way, it’s a non-stop pop rocket into space and a welcome reminder of the unlocked world we once knew. 7/10, New Wave Magazine Extremely accomplished thematically as a body of work, Chromatica is undeniably ideal for any trip to the club. Although conceptual, the album retains a strong sense of integrity and authenticity, no doubt due to Gaga's trademark emotional lyricism. Differently to 'ARTPOP', the project is much more accessible to the mainstream and it feels like a better place in time for this experimental brand of emotional electro-pop. 4 and a half stars, METRO Chromatica is an album about healing and about escape, it takes the transformative power of pop music and applies it to Gaga’s own trauma, that she lays bare on the record. We brought up ARTPOP earlier, and its a pivotal reference to make for Chromatica, that takes all the ambition and creativity of Gaga’s ill-advised third LP, but transfers its manic energy to a streamlined sheen where Gaga seems completely in control, instead of riding a manic beat and spirit too wild to tame.
  10. Bloodpop did that again. Gaga sounds flawless. Smash waiting to happen. PERIOD
  11. Hello everyone! Welcome back to my series! Today I'm reviewing Blackout, also often widely agreed by fans & critics alike as the Bible of Pop. Do you want to know why? Do I agree with that statement? Check it out! 1. Gimme More - This song is properly rated. It's a very fine craft. I like the fact that I can sing Donna Summer's Hot Stuff to this beat. The production is immaculate here. However, this is not one of the strongest songs of the album. It's still awesome, but there's a specific hollow feels in it in my opinion . Score: 3 stars out of 5. 2. Piece of Me - This song is better than the first track. The lyrics, albeit weren't written by Spears herself, truly described her life at that point of her career/fame. The unique production caught me off-guard at first listen, however, it gets so much better. The musicality is astounding! Score: 4 stars out of 5. 3. Radar - This song is nice, it's very addictive. The chorus melodies give me a little "all eyes on me on the center of the ring just like a circus!" tease. Queen of predicting her upcoming projects! Score: 3 stars out of 5. 4. Break the Ice - The first truly great song of the album. Don't worry, there will be more . The production is vastly different compared to the first three tracks. This song has more of an urban/R&B production that makes it sound unique. I can actually sing "gimme gimme more! gimme, gimme gimme more!" to the chorus melodies. Score: 5 stars out of 5. 5. Heaven on Earth - Another great song! I remember the first time I listened to this song I was not impressed at all. I can't remember why I was unimpressed though, maybe it was the lyrics that are too lovey dovey? Anyway, the production is different. Again? I know right, she really curated a very diverse set of songs for this album. I am very impressed now! Score: 5 stars out of 5. 6. Get Naked (I Got a Plan) [feat. A Male Singer or Maybe a Male Rapper That I Still Don't Know] - Petty Britney & team who didn't put the guy's name on the title. This song is fun, it is sexy too. However, it's far too long. Funny thing, Heaven on Earth is actually longer than this song but you wouldn't know that as you listen to this one. It's still nice . Score: 3 stars out of 5. 7. Freakshow - I really like this song. The dubstep element is really nice. It's quite creative. I'm thankful that I bounce back from the previous song . Score: 4 stars out of 5. 8. Toy Soldier - This is a great song. Not only that the lyrics are fun, the melodies, rhythms, and beats are also fun. It's a hilarious combination but it works miraculously. Score: 5 stars out of 5. 9. Hot as Ice - Yes, another great song! The lyrics are fascinating and her singing here is as quizzical as the previous song. I love whenever she sings creatively like this. Score: 5 stars out of 5. 10. Ooh Ooh Baby - This one is good. It's lyrically gorgeous, not like a complete poetry or anything but it's just affectionate. I like the picture she paints on my mind through the delivery of every words. I really like it. It's very melodic. However, there's an annoying "baby baby baby baby baby baby babayy!" part that I just wish was never there . Score: 4 stars out of 5. 11. Perfect Lover - It has cool beats and the rhythmical style of singing is a creative choice. I like it, though I feel that the quality is kind of demo-ish . Overall, it's good. Score: 3 stars out of 5. 12. Why Should I Be Sad - It's not that I dislike the song; the lyrics are amazing. It's very autobiographical. The production is Pharrell's. I like it personally, but it is uneven. The oddest song of all. Regardless, we finish here! Score: 2 stars out of 5. My conclusion for this one is that it is a very glossy pop album that features a whole lotta expensive sounding tracks. The lyrics range from sexual seduction to honest word-vomits. Spears only credited as a co-writer on two songs which are Freakshow and Ooh Ooh Baby, but she is listed as an executive producer of this album. Love a curator! However, the term Bible of Pop or Pop Perfection isn't what I would call this album. It's more of a Diary rather than a Bible. A Bible would be like Madge's Like a Prayer or Prince's Purple Rain, rarely listened but once you listen you'll have a long list of arguments about the "true" meaning AND interpretations of every single syllables. This doesn't make the album less of a masterful craft though. It IS a collection of near perfect pop music, but Britney Spears still has a long way to go (that is if she decides to continue her musical career after the dissolve of that ridiculous conservatorship) if she wants to actually make her own Bible of Spears Pop. So, that's all of it. Remember, it's just me and you don't have to agree with my opinions. You have your own, let's celebrate that love! Don't be too mad, stay listening/streaming to this masterpiece! Love, Tama.
  12. Hello everybody! This review is no longer here because I have moved it to the blog feature. Love, Tama.
  13. Villanelle

    Review

    Georgina AKA The Honest Vocal Coach from Youtube STANS Rain on Me A truly iconic reaction from an iconic queen. And in the words of God herself
  14. Infrared

    Review

    https://pitchfork.com/reviews/tracks/lady-gaga-ariana-grande-rain-on-me/ Lady Gaga and Ariana Grande have both been in the depths of trauma, when it can be hard to believe that your wounds will ever scab over, that the tears will someday stop, that life will ever emerge from the darkness. In 2014, Gaga revealed that she was raped at the age of 19 and developed PTSD. She was eventually diagnosed with fibromyalgia, a chronic illness that causes extreme fatigue and body pain and predominantly affects women. Grande’s grief has been more public: A homemade bomb killed 22 people at the Manchester stop of her Dangerous Woman tour in 2017, and one year later her ex-boyfriend and collaborator Mac Miller died of an accidental overdose. Though each powerhouse diva has explored healing on her own, their long-awaited collaboration “Rain on Me” unlocks newfound strength. Perhaps it is a coincidence, but the fact that the song was released on the anniversary of the Manchester bombing feels especially moving. On “Stupid Love,” the lead single from Gaga’s upcoming album Chromatica, she channeled an earlier era of herself to less groundbreaking effect. “Rain on Me” draws its power from two women connecting on an emotional level; in a recent conversation with Zane Lowe, Gaga said that it felt restorative to mentor a younger female artist, something no one ever did for her. “I never asked for the rainfall/At least I showed up, you showed me nothing at all,”Gaga proclaims at the song’s beginning, with a bravado that would make Ally Maine shake. “It’s coming down on me/Water like misery.” Over a club-ready rush of early ’90s house pop courtesy of BloodPop®, Boys Noize, BURNS, and Tchami, Gaga and Grande proclaim that it’s okay to cry, to stumble, to fall apart; these are necessary parts of survival. “Gotta live my truth, not keep it bottled in/So I don’t lose my mind,” Grande murmurs. Sure, they’d both rather be dry, but for the moment it’s okay to celebrate simply being alive.
  15. Phoebe

    Review

    Break the Ice Get Naked (I Got a Plan) Get Back Gimme More Piece of Me Everybody Perfect Lover Toy Soldier Ooh Ooh Baby Hot as Ice Freakshow Radar Why Should I Be Sad? Outta This World pile of crap Hell on Earth
  16. Phoebe

    Review

    Yes! Another original thread brought to you by yours truly, miss @Phoebe Ghosttown Rebel Heart Messiah Hold Tight Wash All Over Me Inside Out Graffiti Heart Addicted Best Night HeartBreakCity Devil Pray S.E.X. Iconic Borrowed Time Joan of Arc Bitch I'm Madonna Living for Love Beautiful Scars Holy Water Veni Vidi Vici Body Shop Unapologetic Bitch Illuminati Auto-Tune Baby
  17. Beyoncé

    Discussion

    Right girls and gays time to rank. As you all know Beyoncé is one of the greatest performers of all time, meaning every single one of her tours are incredible. However some are quite clearly better than others. Time to see who has taste and who doesn't You can include OTR and OTR II if you want to but I won't as they were joint tours and y'all know how I feel about Jay-Z The Formation World Tour I Am... World Tour The Mrs. Carter Show World Tour The Beyoncé Experience Dangerously in Love Tour Wow all her tours really show her growth as an artist and performer don't they Don't forget to leave your ranking
×