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102-year-old Holocaust survivor meets long lost nephew he didn't know he had

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Jae 23,689

KFAR SABA, Israel — Eliahu Pietruszka shuffled his 102-year-old body through the lobby of his retirement home toward a stranger he had never met and collapsed into him in a teary embrace. Then he kissed both cheeks of his visitor and in a frail, squeaky voice began blurting out greetings in Russian, a language he hadn't spoken in decades.

Only days earlier, the Holocaust survivor who fled Poland at the beginning of World War II and thought his entire family had perished learned that a younger brother had also survived, and his brother's son, 66-year-old Alexandre, was flying in from a remote part of Russia to see him.

The emotional meeting was made possible by Israel's Yad Vashem Holocaust memorial's comprehensive online database of Holocaust victims, a powerful genealogy tool that has reunited hundreds of long-lost relatives. But given the dwindling number of survivors and their advanced ages, Thursday's event seemed likely to be among the last of its kind.

"It makes me so happy that at least one remnant remains from my brother, and that is his son," said Pietruszka, tears welling in his eyes. "After so many years I have been granted the privilege to meet him."

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It must be so bittersweet, to find out your brother who you thought died was actually alive and well for so many years, but at the same time having missed ever seeing him again. cry5

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Aww so happy for him

Even if he never got to see his brother again, knowing that he got to live and have a family must be such a nice surprise giveup1

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Jae 23,689
45 minutes ago, The One Below All said:

I'm happy for the news..but I'd like to point out that Holocaust is such an ignorant word to describe that genocide U_U

How come? 

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17 minutes ago, Javi said:

How come? 

Etymologically from greek it means "sacrifice or offering entirely consumed by fire" which should be enough to understand why it's not the best choice of words. Genocide is a good word to describe what happened but if you'd like to be even more precise you should use the Jewish word Shoah :)

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