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HDD: Kesha's "Woman" featuring pieces of Oprah's speech played on Florida radio station, and the original's official release is tomorrow!

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Dan    11,296

http://hitsdailydouble.com/news&id=309968

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Yes, you read that right. A mash-up version of Kesha’s “Woman” (Kemosabe/RCA)—off latest album Rainbow—has surfaced online, and it includes fragments of Oprah’s powerful and much-discussed Golden Globes speech. 

The reworked track, which is already being used by a radio station in Miami, can be heard via YouTube here, while the original prepares to hit radio tomorrow (ahead of its 1/22 impact date).

 

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Rosé.    7,863

I'm so disgusted by this. Oprah's speech was intellectually null over-emotional bullshit that lacked actual substance and ignored context whilst also spewing irony. KESHA RUN gaga3

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Merryem    5,375
1 hour ago, Manson said:

I'm so disgusted by this. Oprah's speech was intellectually null over-emotional bullshit that lacked actual substance and ignored context whilst also spewing irony. KESHA RUN gaga3

are you trolling

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TomTom2288    5,897

FINALLY and add date! cry1

It probably has been brought forward because it's already performing well on radio

2 hours ago, Manson said:

I'm so disgusted by this. Oprah's speech was intellectually null over-emotional bullshit that lacked actual substance and ignored context whilst also spewing irony. KESHA RUN gaga3

wendy4

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Rosé.    7,863
12 hours ago, Merryem said:

are you trolling

Not this time, no. That speech was appalling.

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Merryem    5,375
2 hours ago, Manson said:

Not this time, no. That speech was appalling.

im very sorry that you think that

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Rosé.    7,863
1 hour ago, Merryem said:

im very sorry that you think that

I'm very sorry that you actually thought it was good and not absolutely disgusting.

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Merryem    5,375
2 hours ago, Manson said:

I'm very sorry that you actually thought it was good and not absolutely disgusting.

well please elaborate on which parts exactly disgusted you, i'd love to hear about it oprah12 here's the full transcript by the way. please point out which parts in particular you thought were absolutely disgusting and the rationale behind your thoughts oprah12 

"Thank you, Reese. In 1964, I was a little girl sitting on the linoleum floor of my mother's house in Milwaukee watching Anne Bancroft present the Oscar for best actor at the 36th Academy Awards. She opened the envelope and said five words that literally made history:" The winner is Sidney Poitier." Up to the stage came the most elegant man I ever remembered. His tie was white, his skin was black—and he was being celebrated. I'd never seen a black man being celebrated like that. I tried many, many times to explain what a moment like that means to a little girl, a kid watching from the cheap seats as my mom came through the door bone tired from cleaning other people's houses. But all I can do is quote and say that the explanation in Sidney's performance in Lilies of the Field: "Amen, amen, amen, amen." 

In 1982, Sidney received the Cecil B. DeMille award right here at the Golden Globes and it is not lost on me that at this moment, there are some little girls watching as I become the first black woman to be given this same award. It is an honor—it is an honor and it is a privilege to share the evening with all of them and also with the incredible men and women who have inspired me, who challenged me, who sustained me and made my journey to this stage possible. Dennis Swanson who took a chance on me for A.M. Chicago. Saw me on the show and said to Steven Spielberg, she's Sophia in 'The Color Purple.' Gayle who's been a friend and Stedman who's been my rock. 

I want to thank the Hollywood Foreign Press Association. We know the press is under siege these days. We also know it's the insatiable dedication to uncovering the absolute truth that keeps us from turning a blind eye to corruption and to injustice. To—to tyrants and victims, and secrets and lies. I want to say that I value the press more than ever before as we try to navigate these complicated times, which brings me to this: what I know for sure is that speaking your truth is the most powerful tool we all have. And I'm especially proud and inspired by all the women who have felt strong enough and empowered enough to speak up and share their personal stories. Each of us in this room are celebrated because of the stories that we tell, and this year we became the story. 

But it's not just a story affecting the entertainment industry. It's one that transcends any culture, geography, race, religion, politics, or workplace. So I want tonight to express gratitude to all the women who have endured years of abuse and assault because they, like my mother, had children to feed and bills to pay and dreams to pursue. They're the women whose names we'll never know. They are domestic workers and farm workers. They are working in factories and they work in restaurants and they're in academia, engineering, medicine, and science. They're part of the world of tech and politics and business. They're our athletes in the Olympics and they're our soldiers in the military. 

And there's someone else, Recy Taylor, a name I know and I think you should know, too. In 1944, Recy Taylor was a young wife and mother walking home from a church service she'd attended in Abbeville, Alabama, when she was abducted by six armed white men, raped, and left blindfolded by the side of the road coming home from church. They threatened to kill her if she ever told anyone, but her story was reported to the NAACP where a young worker by the name of Rosa Parks became the lead investigator on her case and together they sought justice. But justice wasn't an option in the era of Jim Crow. The men who tried to destroy her were never persecuted. Recy Taylor died ten days ago, just shy of her 98th birthday. She lived as we all have lived, too many years in a culture broken by brutally powerful men. For too long, women have not been heard or believed if they dare speak the truth to the power of those men. But their time is up. Their time is up.

Their time is up. And I just hope—I just hope that Recy Taylor died knowing that her truth, like the truth of so many other women who were tormented in those years, and even now tormented, goes marching on. It was somewhere in Rosa Parks' heart almost 11 years later, when she made the decision to stay seated on that bus in Montgomery, and it's here with every woman who chooses to say, "Me too." And every man—every man who chooses to listen. 

In my career, what I've always tried my best to do, whether on television or through film, is to say something about how men and women really behave. To say how we experience shame, how we love and how we rage, how we fail, how we retreat, persevere, and how we overcome. I've interviewed and portrayed people who've withstood some of the ugliest things life can throw at you, but the one quality all of them seem to share is an ability to maintain hope for a brighter morning, even during our darkest nights. So I want all the girls watching here, now, to know that a new day is on the horizon! And when that new day finally dawns, it will be because of a lot of magnificent women, many of whom are right here in this room tonight, and some pretty phenomenal men, fighting hard to make sure that they become the leaders who take us to the time when nobody ever has to say 'Me too' again."

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Rosé.    7,863
35 minutes ago, Merryem said:

well please elaborate on which parts exactly disgusted you, i'd love to hear about it oprah12 here's the full transcript by the way. please point out which parts in particular you thought were absolutely disgusting and the rationale behind your thoughts oprah12 

"Thank you, Reese. In 1964, I was a little girl sitting on the linoleum floor of my mother's house in Milwaukee watching Anne Bancroft present the Oscar for best actor at the 36th Academy Awards. She opened the envelope and said five words that literally made history:" The winner is Sidney Poitier." Up to the stage came the most elegant man I ever remembered. His tie was white, his skin was black—and he was being celebrated. I'd never seen a black man being celebrated like that. I tried many, many times to explain what a moment like that means to a little girl, a kid watching from the cheap seats as my mom came through the door bone tired from cleaning other people's houses. But all I can do is quote and say that the explanation in Sidney's performance in Lilies of the Field: "Amen, amen, amen, amen." 

In 1982, Sidney received the Cecil B. DeMille award right here at the Golden Globes and it is not lost on me that at this moment, there are some little girls watching as I become the first black woman to be given this same award. It is an honor—it is an honor and it is a privilege to share the evening with all of them and also with the incredible men and women who have inspired me, who challenged me, who sustained me and made my journey to this stage possible. Dennis Swanson who took a chance on me for A.M. Chicago. Saw me on the show and said to Steven Spielberg, she's Sophia in 'The Color Purple.' Gayle who's been a friend and Stedman who's been my rock. 

I want to thank the Hollywood Foreign Press Association. We know the press is under siege these days. We also know it's the insatiable dedication to uncovering the absolute truth that keeps us from turning a blind eye to corruption and to injustice. To—to tyrants and victims, and secrets and lies. I want to say that I value the press more than ever before as we try to navigate these complicated times, which brings me to this: what I know for sure is that speaking your truth is the most powerful tool we all have. And I'm especially proud and inspired by all the women who have felt strong enough and empowered enough to speak up and share their personal stories. Each of us in this room are celebrated because of the stories that we tell, and this year we became the story. 

But it's not just a story affecting the entertainment industry. It's one that transcends any culture, geography, race, religion, politics, or workplace. So I want tonight to express gratitude to all the women who have endured years of abuse and assault because they, like my mother, had children to feed and bills to pay and dreams to pursue. They're the women whose names we'll never know. They are domestic workers and farm workers. They are working in factories and they work in restaurants and they're in academia, engineering, medicine, and science. They're part of the world of tech and politics and business. They're our athletes in the Olympics and they're our soldiers in the military. 

And there's someone else, Recy Taylor, a name I know and I think you should know, too. In 1944, Recy Taylor was a young wife and mother walking home from a church service she'd attended in Abbeville, Alabama, when she was abducted by six armed white men, raped, and left blindfolded by the side of the road coming home from church. They threatened to kill her if she ever told anyone, but her story was reported to the NAACP where a young worker by the name of Rosa Parks became the lead investigator on her case and together they sought justice. But justice wasn't an option in the era of Jim Crow. The men who tried to destroy her were never persecuted. Recy Taylor died ten days ago, just shy of her 98th birthday. She lived as we all have lived, too many years in a culture broken by brutally powerful men. For too long, women have not been heard or believed if they dare speak the truth to the power of those men. But their time is up. Their time is up.

Their time is up. And I just hope—I just hope that Recy Taylor died knowing that her truth, like the truth of so many other women who were tormented in those years, and even now tormented, goes marching on. It was somewhere in Rosa Parks' heart almost 11 years later, when she made the decision to stay seated on that bus in Montgomery, and it's here with every woman who chooses to say, "Me too." And every man—every man who chooses to listen. 

In my career, what I've always tried my best to do, whether on television or through film, is to say something about how men and women really behave. To say how we experience shame, how we love and how we rage, how we fail, how we retreat, persevere, and how we overcome. I've interviewed and portrayed people who've withstood some of the ugliest things life can throw at you, but the one quality all of them seem to share is an ability to maintain hope for a brighter morning, even during our darkest nights. So I want all the girls watching here, now, to know that a new day is on the horizon! And when that new day finally dawns, it will be because of a lot of magnificent women, many of whom are right here in this room tonight, and some pretty phenomenal men, fighting hard to make sure that they become the leaders who take us to the time when nobody ever has to say 'Me too' again."

Gimme a minute.

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Rosé.    7,863

@Merryem

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"Thank you, Reese. In 1964, I was a little girl sitting on the linoleum floor of my mother's house in Milwaukee watching Anne Bancroft present the Oscar for best actor at the 36th Academy Awards. She opened the envelope and said five words that literally made history:" The winner is Sidney Poitier." Up to the stage came the most elegant man I ever remembered. His tie was white, his skin was black—and he was being celebrated. I'd never seen a black man being celebrated like that. I tried many, many times to explain what a moment like that means to a little girl, a kid watching from the cheap seats as my mom came through the door bone tired from cleaning other people's houses. But all I can do is quote and say that the explanation in Sidney's performance in Lilies of the Field: "Amen, amen, amen, amen." 

In the context of that time, I can completely agree with what she's saying, but in a modern context that story means nothing, because their are no more barriers for black people than any other race in America. It is a statement that implies that race is still a huge issue, when it isn't. No one's rights are determined by their race and socially race isn't a huge issue either, except when certain people like Oprah try to make it seem as though race is a huge issue, then people believe it and subsequently act on it and it becomes a whole "fuck white people" situation.

Quote

In 1982, Sidney received the Cecil B. DeMille award right here at the Golden Globes and it is not lost on me that at this moment, there are some little girls watching as I become the first black woman to be given this same award. It is an honor—it is an honor and it is a privilege to share the evening with all of them and also with the incredible men and women who have inspired me, who challenged me, who sustained me and made my journey to this stage possible. Dennis Swanson who took a chance on me for A.M. Chicago. Saw me on the show and said to Steven Spielberg, she's Sophia in 'The Color Purple.' Gayle who's been a friend and Stedman who's been my rock. 

Oprah's bringing up race again, even though it shouldn't be relevant at all. She's also bringing gender into the conversation, despite women having the exact same (and sometimes more e.g. Affirmative Action [This also applies to race]) opportunities than men.

 

My point in the last two quotes is that Oprah is conflating the past and present to make it seem like past problems are present problems. This actually undermines all the great strides made by civil rights activists that have created equality in the modern world.

Quote

I want to thank the Hollywood Foreign Press Association. We know the press is under siege these days. We also know it's the insatiable dedication to uncovering the absolute truth that keeps us from turning a blind eye to corruption and to injustice. To—to tyrants and victims, and secrets and lies. I want to say that I value the press more than ever before as we try to navigate these complicated times, which brings me to this: what I know for sure is that speaking your truth is the most powerful tool we all have. And I'm especially proud and inspired by all the women who have felt strong enough and empowered enough to speak up and share their personal stories. Each of us in this room are celebrated because of the stories that we tell, and this year we became the story. 

The press is under siege because of far left wing influence suffocating out other perspectives, to push their victimhood agendas. Oprah is likely far left and acting as though she has no part in this when she is one of the people bringing up racial minorities and women being oppressed when the aren't. She is perpetuating media lies.

 

This whole "speak your truth" thing is awful too. There isn't "your truth" and "my truth", there are opinions and then there is "the truth". If a person can't prove something is true, then no one should consider it true.

 

These women speaking out are not brave. They are huge cowards. They are speaking out at a time where it has been made 100% safe to speak out and non of them are risking anything by doing so. In fact they actually have a lot to gain from"speaking out", regardless of wether they have any evidence of their unproven assaults, they will be commended and gain greater public respect. Assuming these women were assaulted, they should've reported their assaults to the police while they still had physical evidence, so that they could prosecute their attackers and make sure that no other people were assaulted. THAT would've been brave. Not tweeting 10 years later "#metoo guys *heart emoji*", when these women are now rich, powerful, safe, influential and had excessive time to process and get therapy. These women allowed other women to be assaulted.

Quote

But it's not just a story affecting the entertainment industry. It's one that transcends any culture, geography, race, religion, politics, or workplace. So I want tonight to express gratitude to all the women who have endured years of abuse and assault because they, like my mother, had children to feed and bills to pay and dreams to pursue. They're the women whose names we'll never know. They are domestic workers and farm workers. They are working in factories and they work in restaurants and they're in academia, engineering, medicine, and science. They're part of the world of tech and politics and business. They're our athletes in the Olympics and they're our soldiers in the military. 

Oprah explains how these women weren't actually willing to risk anything, because of their personal desires. She's also completely ignoring the fact that men are common victims of abuse too. 

 

Oprah throws out a redundant "girls can do anything" message. Like seriously? We know, it's in all our media, despite women having all the resources they need to do as they please and not actually needing women specific emopowerment. Also, she ignores the important role of mothers who choose to stay home to raise their children, in favour of other important jobs that women typically don't even want. 

Quote

And there's someone else, Recy Taylor, a name I know and I think you should know, too. In 1944, Recy Taylor was a young wife and mother walking home from a church service she'd attended in Abbeville, Alabama, when she was abducted by six armed white men, raped, and left blindfolded by the side of the road coming home from church. They threatened to kill her if she ever told anyone, but her story was reported to the NAACP where a young worker by the name of Rosa Parks became the lead investigator on her case and together they sought justice. But justice wasn't an option in the era of Jim Crow. The men who tried to destroy her were never persecuted. Recy Taylor died ten days ago, just shy of her 98th birthday. She lived as we all have lived, too many years in a culture broken by brutally powerful men. For too long, women have not been heard or believed if they dare speak the truth to the power of those men. But their time is up. Their time is up.

 

Their time is up. And I just hope—I just hope that Recy Taylor died knowing that her truth, like the truth of so many other women who were tormented in those years, and even now tormented, goes marching on. It was somewhere in Rosa Parks' heart almost 11 years later, when she made the decision to stay seated on that bus in Montgomery, and it's here with every woman who chooses to say, "Me too." And every man—every man who chooses to listen. 

Taylor actually did something about her assault, something that these other women had much more opportunity and ability to do in the modern day. Taylor was actually brave. These other women sat idle and did nothing about their abusers. Oprah proceeds to act as though women have been powerless victims since 1944. A crock of shit. She's making excuses for women who don't report their rapes and allow rapists to go free. Oprah is disrespecting actually powerless women. Women who don't have rights today. She's also taking a huge shit on great achievements of first and second wave feminism, that got women all their rights. It's disgusting.

Quote

In my career, what I've always tried my best to do, whether on television or through film, is to say something about how men and women really behave. To say how we experience shame, how we love and how we rage, how we fail, how we retreat, persevere, and how we overcome. I've interviewed and portrayed people who've withstood some of the ugliest things life can throw at you, but the one quality all of them seem to share is an ability to maintain hope for a brighter morning, even during our darkest nights. So I want all the girls watching here, now, to know that a new day is on the horizon! And when that new day finally dawns, it will be because of a lot of magnificent women, many of whom are right here in this room tonight, and some pretty phenomenal men, fighting hard to make sure that they become the leaders who take us to the time when nobody ever has to say 'Me too' again."

"Women are oppressed" and "We still have a long way to go" basically. BULL-FUCKING-SHIT. The media always sides with rape accusers, western society hates rape and women have all the rights men have in the West.

 

There is fuck all left to fight for, so whatever this new "day on the horizon" is, I'd be shocked if anything positive comes of it.

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Merryem    5,375
1 hour ago, Manson said:

@Merryem

In the context of that time, I can completely agree with what she's saying, but in a modern context that story means nothing, because their are no more barriers for black people than any other race in America. It is a statement that implies that race is still a huge issue, when it isn't. No one's rights are determined by their race and socially race isn't a huge issue either, except when certain people like Oprah try to make it seem as though race is a huge issue, then people believe it and subsequently act on it and it becomes a whole "fuck white people" situation.

Oprah's bringing up race again, even though it shouldn't be relevant at all. She's also bringing gender into the conversation, despite women having the exact same (and sometimes more e.g. Affirmative Action [This also applies to race]) opportunities than men.

 

My point in the last two quotes is that Oprah is conflating the past and present to make it seem like past problems are present problems. This actually undermines all the great strides made by civil rights activists that have created equality in the modern world.

The press is under siege because of far left wing influence suffocating out other perspectives, to push their victimhood agendas. Oprah is likely far left and acting as though she has no part in this when she is one of the people bringing up racial minorities and women being oppressed when the aren't. She is perpetuating media lies.

 

This whole "speak your truth" thing is awful too. There isn't "your truth" and "my truth", there are opinions and then there is "the truth". If a person can't prove something is true, then no one should consider it true.

 

These women speaking out are not brave. They are huge cowards. They are speaking out at a time where it has been made 100% safe to speak out and non of them are risking anything by doing so. In fact they actually have a lot to gain from"speaking out", regardless of wether they have any evidence of their unproven assaults, they will be commended and gain greater public respect. Assuming these women were assaulted, they should've reported their assaults to the police while they still had physical evidence, so that they could prosecute their attackers and make sure that no other people were assaulted. THAT would've been brave. Not tweeting 10 years later "#metoo guys *heart emoji*", when these women are now rich, powerful, safe, influential and had excessive time to process and get therapy. These women allowed other women to be assaulted.

Oprah explains how these women weren't actually willing to risk anything, because of their personal desires. She's also completely ignoring the fact that men are common victims of abuse too. 

 

Oprah throws out a redundant "girls can do anything" message. Like seriously? We know, it's in all our media, despite women having all the resources they need to do as they please and not actually needing women specific emopowerment. Also, she ignores the important role of mothers who choose to stay home to raise their children, in favour of other important jobs that women typically don't even want. 

Taylor actually did something about her assault, something that these other women had much more opportunity and ability to do in the modern day. Taylor was actually brave. These other women sat idle and did nothing about their abusers. Oprah proceeds to act as though women have been powerless victims since 1944. A crock of shit. She's making excuses for women who don't report their rapes and allow rapists to go free. Oprah is disrespecting actually powerless women. Women who don't have rights today. She's also taking a huge shit on great achievements of first and second wave feminism, that got women all their rights. It's disgusting.

"Women are oppressed" and "We still have a long way to go" basically. BULL-FUCKING-SHIT. The media always sides with rape accusers, western society hates rape and women have all the rights men have in the West.

 

There is fuck all left to fight for, so whatever this new "day on the horizon" is, I'd be shocked if anything positive comes of it.

11

Okay, first of all, I can tell we won't agree on anything because from your post it's obvious you're conservative or have conservative tendencies. But I'll try anyways.

 

Quote

In the context of that time, I can completely agree with what she's saying, but in a modern context that story means nothing, because their are no more barriers for black people than any other race in America. It is a statement that implies that race is still a huge issue, when it isn't. No one's rights are determined by their race and socially race isn't a huge issue either, except when certain people like Oprah try to make it seem as though race is a huge issue, then people believe it and subsequently act on it and it becomes a whole "fuck white people" situation.

4

How can you say there are no barriers for black people when we're in the middle of an intense race crisis? Studies done SHOW that racial identity was brought up as a primary reason as to why the majority of white voters voted for Trump. In fact, a nonpartisan election study done by the American National Election Studies shows that xenophobia and racial animus was a more prominent factor in voting for Trump than concerns over the economy. Multiple studies have shown that PoC get paid less than their white counterparts for doing equal work; white people still make up the overwhelming majority of the upper class not nearly representational to the actual racial demographic that represents America. The #BLM is still going strong and only recently have social movements begun to see PoC standing on similar grounds within Hollywood; and even that only extends to African Americans. Asian Americans still have nearly zero representation in Hollywood; no Asian American actor has EVER even been nominated, let alone win, an Academy Award for Best Actor or Actress. The white-washing of asian movies such as Ghost in the Shell or the Great Wall shows how little PoC receive in terms of representation; even the author of Crazy Rich Asians said that the first people approaching him for a movie adaptation wanted to change the actors playing the characters in a book called Crazy Rich ASIANS to an all-white cast. So, yes race is absolutely still an issue in all aspects of American culture, from the political, to the social, to the economic scene. To ignore all the evidence pointing to such is just willful ignorance.

 

okay this mess of quotes did not turn out how i wanted it formatted can some mod help dead4 i can't even edit and paste because it won't let me highlight text in the quote boxes dead4 @Americunt @Lachlan @Tasso

i'll just try to post images for now dead2

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Hopefully these crappily pasted images will do until a mod can fix the mess of quotes below if they care to do it dead4 the links to the studies are also below but I can't figure out how to fix the formatting but for now this will do. 

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Oprah's bringing up race again, even though it shouldn't be relevant at all. She's also bringing gender into the conversation, despite women having the exact same (and sometimes more e.g. Affirmative Action [This also applies to race]) opportunities than men

 

How can you bring up Affirmative Action as a way of women benefiting and not think race is an issue in America? That's literally counterintuitive. On another note, women do not have the exact same opportunities as men in any way. They are getting closer to that but there is still overwhelming evidence pointing to the contrary; just look at the representation in our government for that. Sexism is rampant in America, from the representation of those applying for certain jobs being skewed towards women in certain fields (such as political internships) yet still being primarily represented by men. Additionally, women are pushed to seek jobs in traditionally "feminine" fields, and only recently have efforts to push them into fields of stem and sciences been contributing to seeing women gain more prominence in male-dominated fields. And yet you still have people defending the "Male Manifesto" the google employee put out essentially saying women are "biologically inferior" and thus can't hold jobs that men can hold; people actually defend that person. And yet women are on the same playing field as men? Even in the pop music sphere, men hold overwhelming advantages over women and that's acknowledged everywhere on this forum...how can you even say that women are on an equal playing level as men.

 

 

My point in the last two quotes is that Oprah is conflating the past and present to make it seem like past problems are present problems. This actually undermines all the great strides made by civil rights activists that have created equality in the modern world.

The press is under siege because of far left wing influence suffocating out other perspectives, to push their victimhood agendas. Oprah is likely far left and acting as though she has no part in this when she is one of the people bringing up racial minorities and women being oppressed when the aren't. She is perpetuating media lies.

What in fact is undermining the great strides made by civil rights activists isn't "people making past problems present problems", it's the backtracking of the progress made by racist, xenophobic, and homophobic conservatives trying to "purify" America. Recent times have reflected that enormously; DACA being taken back despite evidence pointing to the immigrants who utilize DACA having a nearly 100% integration rate and higher work ethic than the typical American. 

And the press being under siege by "far left-wing influence suffocating out other perspectives" fails to mention the far right agenda; you only push this perspective when it's convenient for you. If the media is biased, turn to objective information sources to make informed observations. Have you noticed that the majority of academic publications seem "left-leaning"? It's not because they have political agendas to push, it's because the information presented in nonpartisan studies POINT to evidence supporting liberal viewpoints. A College education is proven to push students from Republican origins to become Democratic after graduating; this isn't because college is some kind of liberal hell-hole where conservative perspectives go to die, it's because the factual information and variety of perspectives gained from going to college usually points to liberal, democratic viewpoints as where society is naturally progressing. In fact, a study asking various peoples to rank the importance of various traits showed that conservatives ranked the trait of "tradition" the highest while liberals ranked the trait of "empathy" as the highest. Does that indicate something?

 

 

This whole "speak your truth" thing is awful too. There isn't "your truth" and "my truth", there are opinions and then there is "the truth". If a person can't prove something is true, then no one should consider it true.

One person's truth may not be another person's truth. Subjective experiences don't necessarily mean they are an opinion. If one person sees another person take something from them, that's not an opinion, that's a fact. But the other person may think they're not taking it, just borrowing it. These are not opinions, they are facts that were subjective based on the person's viewpoint.

 

 

These women speaking out are not brave. They are huge cowards. They are speaking out at a time where it has been made 100% safe to speak out and non of them are risking anything by doing so. In fact they actually have a lot to gain from"speaking out", regardless of wether they have any evidence of their unproven assaults, they will be commended and gain greater public respect. Assuming these women were assaulted, they should've reported their assaults to the police while they still had physical evidence, so that they could prosecute their attackers and make sure that no other people were assaulted. THAT would've been brave. Not tweeting 10 years later "#metoo guys *heart emoji*", when these women are now rich, powerful, safe, influential and had excessive time to process and get therapy. These women allowed other women to be assaulted.

Oprah explains how these women weren't actually willing to risk anything, because of their personal desires. She's also completely ignoring the fact that men are common victims of abuse too.

Providing an environment where a women's career won't come to a screeching halt for coming out against their assualtors is cowardice? I don't even know where to begin with this post. It's been PROVEN that nearly 98% of rape reports are true, yet less than half of reported rapes result in legal action. Why does a woman have to risk something to come out against their sexual predators? Women who are pursuing ambitious careers are quite literally at the mercy of powerful men dominating the industry when they're beginning out. Coming out with sexual assault allegations against those men could mean their careers being ruined. Is a woman having to decide between her career and coming out against her abuser "brave"? Simplifying the movement down to a straw-man tweet isn't doing anything for you. The movement is far bigger than people tweeting, it's people coming out against the odds having always been stacked against them and finally having the environment necessary to be able to come out against their abusers without fear of their careers being ruined because of it. If you were to call someone cowardly, why not the abusers?

Also you can address one issue without addressing all. Men are victims of abuse, yes, but on a far lessor level than women. Oprah can support women victims of abuse without extending that to all men as well, she is not bringing down male victims of abuse in any way so that's not even a valid point.

 

 

Taylor actually did something about her assault, something that these other women had much more opportunity and ability to do in the modern day. Taylor was actually brave. These other women sat idle and did nothing about their abusers. Oprah proceeds to act as though women have been powerless victims since 1944. A crock of shit. She's making excuses for women who don't report their rapes and allow rapists to go free. Oprah is disrespecting actually powerless women. Women who don't have rights today. She's also taking a huge shit on great achievements of first and second wave feminism, that got women all their rights. It's disgusting.

Are you seriously saying that one of the most powerful, influential, wealthy, women in the world who is both straight and white coming out against her abuser is a shining example for all other women to follow?  Again, most women are NOT in the position to come out against their abusers. Not everyone is Taylor Swift. A actress just starting out in Hollywood being abused by a powerful director or producer has EVERYTHING to lose by coming out against them; if they aren't believed, their careers are over. And even if they are believed and manage to prove it, the abuser still has enough power and influence to blacklist the actress forever. And she isn't just expressing support for women in the entertainment industry; she's coming out for women EVERYWHERE, in all fields. It's not a black or white issue.

 

 

"Women are oppressed" and "We still have a long way to go" basically. BULL-FUCKING-SHIT. The media always sides with rape accusers, western society hates rape and women have all the rights men have in the West.

What? There have petitions defending abusers before. There was a whole LIST of Hollywood A-listers giving active, written support to Woody Allen despite the fact that Allen having been subject to MOUNDS of allegations against him by various actresses who have nothing in common. Woody Allen's DAUGHTER has even come out against him, yet Hollywood stood behind him. And yet the media always sides with the accusers?

 

 

There is fuck all left to fight for, so whatever this new "day on the horizon" is, I'd be shocked if anything positive comes of it.

I have nothing to say to this. Only those who have everything to take for granted would say there is "fuck all to fight for". Your post seems steeped in ignorane and bigotry; I hope this post serves to help you to change your perspective. 

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Rosé.    7,863
2 hours ago, Merryem said:

Okay, first of all, I can tell we won't agree on anything because from your post it's obvious you're conservative or have conservative tendencies. But I'll try anyways.

 

How can you say there are no barriers for black people when we're in the middle of an intense race crisis? Studies done SHOW that racial identity was brought up as a primary reason as to why the majority of white voters voted for Trump. In fact, a nonpartisan election study done by the American National Election Studies shows that xenophobia and racial animus was a more prominent factor in voting for Trump than concerns over the economy. Multiple studies have shown that PoC get paid less than their white counterparts for doing equal work; white people still make up the overwhelming majority of the upper class not nearly representational to the actual racial demographic that represents America. The #BLM is still going strong and only recently have social movements begun to see PoC standing on similar grounds within Hollywood; and even that only extends to African Americans. Asian Americans still have nearly zero representation in Hollywood; no Asian American actor has EVER even been nominated, let alone win, an Academy Award for Best Actor or Actress. The white-washing of asian movies such as Ghost in the Shell or the Great Wall shows how little PoC receive in terms of representation; even the author of Crazy Rich Asians said that the first people approaching him for a movie adaptation wanted to change the actors playing the characters in a book called Crazy Rich ASIANS to an all-white cast. So, yes race is absolutely still an issue in all aspects of American culture, from the political, to the social, to the economic scene. To ignore all the evidence pointing to such is just willful ignorance.

 

okay this mess of quotes did not turn out how i wanted it formatted can some mod help dead4 i can't even edit and paste because it won't let me highlight text in the quote boxes dead4 @Americunt @Lachlan @Tasso

i'll just try to post images for now dead2

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Hopefully these crappily pasted images will do until a mod can fix the mess of quotes below if they care to do it dead4 the links to the studies are also below but I can't figure out how to fix the formatting but for now this will do. 

I almost completely disagree with you and this is really too much to unpack on a pop forum (also cause of the formatting and this being in a music related section), so sorry if you wanted a full response.

I'm politically centre and take everything issue by issue. I don't have a left or right team I'm rooting for. I want gender and race equality, I just don't see there being huge issues for gender and race equality in the West. I'm not sure how that makes me a bigot, but I guess that's just "your truth".

 

Stay skeptical, Manson kesha4

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Merryem    5,375
18 minutes ago, Manson said:

I almost completely disagree with you and this is really too much to unpack on a pop forum (also cause of the formatting and this being in a music related section), so sorry if you wanted a full response.

I'm politically centre and take everything issue by issue. I don't have a left or right team I'm rooting for. I want gender and race equality, I just don't see there being huge issues for gender and race equality in the West. I'm not sure how that makes me a bigot, but I guess that's just "your truth".

 

Stay skeptical, Manson kesha4

3

there's a difference between not seeing something and it not being there. studies have been done, data has been collected, facts have been proven. thinking race or gender equality is not an issue in modern america is just stubborn ignorance, nothing more.

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