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Create A Label: Season 10

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2 minutes ago, Ronlop said:

@hector Where is Rebirth tour article?

On S4 but I couldn't find it giveup2 but i DID post it, if not I wouldn't have done this. Like with the LLIV tour that never happened, i was also gonna do this with Shakira's Classic tour but i didn't knew if i was allowed to

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PRESS RELEASE CONCERNING SKY FERREIRA:

"IN HONOR OF BLACK FRIDAY AND CYBER MONDAY, DOOMSDAY, THE LEAD SINGLE BY SKY FERREIRA  WILL BE DISCOUNTED ON iTunes UNTIL TUESDAY NOVEMBER 28, 2018"

 

DOOMSDAY - $0.69

 

 FURTHERMORE,  SKY FERREIRA IS HAPPY TO ANNOUNCE THAT THERE WILL BE LIMITED COPIES (PHYSICAL CDS AND VINYLS) OF THE SINGLE WILL BE AVAILABLE FOR SHIPPING AND HANDLING STARTING THIS WEEKEND WITH A DISCOUNTED PRICE, AGAIN UNTIL TUESDAY WHEN THEY WILL BE AT FULL PRICE! (please drag me if this isn't allowed thanks :) )

 

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THE RECORD WILL INCLUDE TWO REMIXES OF THE SINGLE "DOOMSDAY" AND AN EXCLUSIVE B-SIDE TRACK, A COVER OF  "EASY" BY THE COMMODORES

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republic records encore commercial

 

CRIMINAL MUSIC VIDEO TRAILER AIRS ON ABC, NBC AND CBS AFTER THE COMMERCIAL

RELEASE:

Spoiler

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reference as how he would be dancing with his song "goddess" playing in the background

Spoiler

 

 

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@Ronlop\

is it ok if i post the rest of the articles tomorrow? i need to head out and wont have time askjbf how many hours left are there? and also, can i update my playlists tomorrow morning too? pls say yes giveup2 

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15 minutes ago, hector said:

@Ronlop\

is it ok if i post the rest of the articles tomorrow? i need to head out and wont have time askjbf how many hours left are there? and also, can i update my playlists tomorrow morning too? pls say yes giveup2 

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until Black Friday is over

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Janelle Monáe and David Simon talk Amazon Prime Video's "Heavy" and performs "Night Dreamer" on Conan

 

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“Heavy” is about the downfall of a civilization. Every moment of happiness these women try to find is marred by someone succeeding where they failed, or death. Yet, like all women, they persist. A series of catastrophes slowly upends the stability of this world, starting with a business trip the father takes that proves calamitous. There’s also an earthquake, a shattered window, an unexpected pregnancy, death and betrayal. Sensuality meets violence. A country ruptures. A family dissolves. The interweaving stories of loss and perseverance are deeply realized. Disappointment and agony is quite difficult to assert towards a loved one; Laymon augments their rancor as he has his own children as well. At this age, his mother develops a gambling problem. What's his biggest inhibition? Reckoning the implicit ways he's harmed the women who nurtured him out of mere morality. It's indicative that he did not have a predominant male figure throughout the entirety of his life. It’s an extraordinary transformation, one that emerges through seemingly unconnected narrative fragments, tenderly observed moments and a formal rigor that might go unnoticed. His mother beats him. His father doesn’t pay child support. There is always the specter of state violence, casual racism and the brutal difficulty of having a body that lets you down. “Heavy” expresses defeat and desolation, and the impotence of mother-son dynamics, adrift forever, at outs with the forces of nature. This defeat is shown through the careful editing, paced and rhythmical, replete with dissolving images. Barry Jenkins’ “Heavy” fixates on Laymon’s emotional and psychological struggles with an intensity that’s harrowing. One could see the series as a political statement about subjugation, power and deceit—or about the  fundamental issues of language and conceptualization. 

David Simon’s first book, Homicide: A Year on the Killing Streets (1991), became an NBC series, and his second—written with Edward Burns, a homicide detective in Baltimore—The Corner: A Year in the Life of an Inner-City Neighborhood (1997), was made into an HBO miniseries. By 2002, he had created a series for HBO about the war on drugs in Baltimore hailed as one of the best dramas in the history of television: The Wire. Now, he has worked with Janelle Monáe to adapt Kiese Laymon’s “Heavy” on Amazon Prime Video. “Heavy” is a series that chronicles the story of a black male in a suprematic nation, however its rhetoric is far bigger than a person’s narrative. As the series progresses, Barry Jenkins’ “Heavy” is a compelling examination of propaganda and the struggles of emotional trauma. Perception matters and is far more intriguing than what meets the eye. HBO is currently working on Simon’s miniseries about a hypothetical U.S. reality following the Pittsburgh Synagogue massacre based on Philip Roth’s The Plot Against America. We see a direct influence regarding Roth’s counterfactual history in several episodes. David Simon’s introspective series The Wire is detailed exploration and indictment of the systematic corruption, and racism—and “Heavy” now emphasizes the importance of accounting Laymon’s life: especially when counterterrorism gradually becomes a higher threat. The Wire fleshed out characters often left out of narratives elsewhere—especially in Baltimore’s poor, black neighborhoods—humanizing people in marginalized places. “Working with Monáe was a completely different experience than what I am accustomed to” he says. “I thought about going out to a couple of black novelists and I sort of explored that and found that they had their own stuff that they were trying to develop for [The Wire].. It's actually quite the opposite in this instance. [A viewer] loves being immersed in a new, confusing and possibly dangerous world that he will never see. This series is a depiction of people’s harsh and often gruesome realities.”

“Whenever police were portrayed, particularly in film and television, particularly in television, they were not only unequivocally heroic, not really honorable or functional, or competent, but they cared.” David says. “Common notions of police work is skewed by their sense of legitimate outrage, coupled with, sort of, a half-aware perspective of what police work has to be. And the police are utterly blind to the legitimacy, a lot of them are blind to the legitimacy of what is the revelation in this.” The HBO series explored Baltimore's drug scene and the corruption of the city's social, governmental and media institutions. “And I'm sure the series has its merits but not everything is, the real issues facing American cities aren't if we could just get the dogs to stop biting - I was much more interested in why isn't the drug war working?”  Janelle Monáe plays Kiese Laymon’s mother, and eventually she develops a gambling and opioid addiction. More than a decade into the opioid crisis, the United States is deficient of an integrated federal response to reduce the rates of overdose-related death and disability. At first, though, it’s a pleasant distraction from an otherwise mundane existence. She forcefully encourages Laymon to write punishing essays, over and over, a kind of training, he eventually realizes, for making his voice heard. “Usually, when I wanted to run from memory, I transcribed rap lyrics, or I drew two-story houses, or I wrote poems to Layla, or I watched black sitcoms … or I ate and drank everything that wasn't nailed down” he says. The exploration of the function of art in a morally vacuous society so ambivalent that it makes for an extremely difficult and challenging viewing. A poignant statement by Kiese Laymon was shared on Conan. Monáe states that the “most abusive parts of our nation obsessively neglect yesterday while peddling in possibility”. 

The parental mandate to serve and protect, with disturbing authoritarian overtones, is fraught with difficulty. It’s a universal experience—your parents go from unimpeachable rulers to fallible human beings. Kiese Laymon’s masterstroke is to keep his family’s members unnamed—a canny move toward thematic universality that is also subtly unnerving in its oddity. “There haven't been enough of these and they were few and far between,” Jenkins says in reference to series’ adapted from black literature. “I don't want to sound as though every novel by a black author should be translated to the screen, but sure many more of them should be.” The need to push for change is on everyone in the industry — studios, distributors, producers and filmmakers — says Dede Gardner, co-president at Plan B, the production company behind “Selma,” “Twelve Years,” “Moonlight,” “Beale Street,” and now “Heavy”. He states that “you either commit yourself to telling underrepresented stories or you don't.” Janelle Monáe strives to shed light on underrepresented individuals.  “The global message for the African is, if we don’t catch that train - and the train is leaving now - too bad for us. Tomorrow will be too late,” she says. “It's not only very clear there is an audience for this work, but to take it even further, there are people who are familiar with this work in its literary form — the same way people are familiar with work of non-black artists.” In absence of conventional institutions and contexts, Monáe burgeons. The lack of safe recreational facilities for black youth is one of many indicators of the massive divestments that stripped these communities of social services, employment opportunities, and more. Racism and discrimina­tion in education, employment, and housing are an undeniable reality, and in the wake of rebellion these upheavals became more prevalent than ever before. 

Janelle Monáe performed “Night Dreamer” with her quartet. Erickson Beamon collaborated with Swarovski to create a custom crystal dress inspired by winter and what the season is connotated with. She sang the song blissfully as she stood on a translucent platform—until she became submerged into water during the chorus. Suddenly, the water turned a crimson red as the platform turned into a fountain. Monáe stood on the platform as it rose onstage while wearing a metal frame with manacles on each corner that attached to a her upper arms and thighs—a reference to Alexander McQueen. The water splurged across the stage and created enormous waves as she sang the song. Large LED screens surrounded her as they screened beautiful images of Monáe dancing on the Bonneville Salt Flats whilst chanting the lyrics.


Every wave is a tidal
Don't fight the rising sea
Don't run or slip away
The night dreamer is scarred by the hands of faith

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13 minutes ago, Alesus said:

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until Black Friday is over

omg a life saver giveup1 whew i have time to get drunk, hate myself for doing it and sleep. ugh!

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