Jump to content

Create A Label: Season 10

Recommended Posts

2Nv4L.png

SHAWN MENDES CALLS INTO NOVA 100 MELBOURNE

 

 

 

Shawn Mendes is currently on his first ever promotional tour of Australia! He's out right now supporting his impressively successful single "Mysterious Skin" which has returned Shawn back to the top 20! The song has officially ignited a brand new era and a brand new incarnation of the 20 year old hitmaker. Abandoning the largely pop influenced sound of his debut record The Resistance, Shawn has moved to a harder, rock driven sound. With that he has also gone through a lyrical reinvention, focusing intensely on himself and allowing the world to see directly into his mind in order to break down the traditional barrier between artist and audience. The song has endlessly captivated fans and is gaining Shawn some new fans as well. Shawn's also handed out an early Christmas gift to fans in his first Christmas song "I'll Be Home for Christmas" which details Shawn rushing to get home to spend the holidays with his family. The song has also been successful, debuting at #6 on the holiday charts. As part of his promotional tour Down Under, Shawn called into Nova 100 in Melbourne!

 

SML_GQItalia.jpg

 

  • ON DEVELOPING AS A MUSICIAN

"Madonna taught me at the very beginning that the very second you become comfortable with your musical knowledge, then you're already behind. I like to try and challenge myself as much as possible when it comes to my music. I want to grow and be able to expand on my skills. It's crazy because my band members are all so insanely talented that when they pick up a new instrument, they seem to be instant masters of it! I'm a little slower going when it comes to taking new things up. Guitar was the first instrument I learned to play and I learned from self-teaching, so it came easy. But learning piano was a totally different story. With this album, I wanted to learn at least one new instrument so I decided to take up working a little on the violin. I'm not credited as a violin player on the album but I do a bit. It's important to me to do new things musically and broadening my horizons!!

 

  • ON THE SURPRISE SUCCESS OF "MYSTERIOUS SKIN"

"They say in the industry to never anticipate but just take it as it comes. But that still doesn't change excitement from success! A song like this was a risky move for me anyway but add in the new risk of it being not only personal but also somewhat intense, it makes it even more of a shock to us that the song is doing what it is. But I'm completely thrilled by all of the love! It's something that would have never crossed my mind. When I was writing the song I didn't even intended it to be a single. But I had felt such an intense pull to it that I had to. I think that we're all surprised at the success. We knew it had potential but never that it could have done something so big. I'm thrilled! We're thrilled!"

 

  • ON POTENTIAL COLLABORATIONS

"Well as of now I don't have any lined of song collaborations. But I am working on a some conceptual collaborations! A really amazing artist is putting together a Christmas project that I've been lucky enough to get an invite too. But other than that, I've got nothing! However the more time passes, the more I wang to work with Lana and just spend some time watching her progress in studio and watching her work. I don't know if she'd be interested but I'd love too someday. I'd probably sing the whole song a nervous wreck though! 

 

 

HOST: "Shawn's new song 'Mysterious Skin' and his Christmas track 'I'll Be Home for Christmas' are both available now on a big discount for Black Friday along with some other Shawn goodies. Remember Encore is free today so stream Shawn's music and subscribe to his Encore channel to be the first to get new Shawn music! Now sit back because here's 'Mysterious Skin' by Shawn Mendes!"

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Janelle Monáe performs on GMA

 

RG0A3329-_-2.jpg?format=1000w

 

“The cultural landscape is not fixed. It can be shifted and changed. And we can claim places in it—and Janelle Monáe is the perfect musician to encourage that” Thelma Golden says in a Good Morning America Segment. In Exposition Park, at the California African American Museum (CAAM), Los Angeles painter Gary Simmons discussed Janelle’s directorial debut “Darker Than Blue” to create a series of large-scale murals on long-term view that explore the early history of black film. Surprisingly, the film is quite meditative, echoing in some ways the classics of Italian neorealism. Void of time-bound details, her expressive portraits of compelling characters read both historic and contemporary. Visuals of Janelle Monáe gyrating around horrific surroundings has circulated around the streets of New York. Each of the images wanders aimlessly through tangents, spiraling into moments where one word or phrase is repeated continuously as Monáe contemplates something indirectly related to the narrative. Exhibitions and programs are currently in partnership with other institutions. Organized by associate curator Connie Choi, whose portfolio includes responsibility for the collection, “Black Refractions” is the latest interim project, an ambitious effort to reach audiences far beyond Harlem. The gathering of artists, curators, and collectors will center around “identity, politics, and the role of institutions on the works and careers of artists of African descent.” 

“The problem isn’t their production, it’s their distribution, particularly theatrical distribution, which they’re struggling to get,” she says. “If you’re going to spend a substantial amount of funds, at least it should come back and give employment to a certain amount of people so you have advanced the economy.” The lack of safe recreational facilities for black youth is one of many indicators of the massive divestments that stripped these communities of social services, employment opportunities, and more. “My mom,” she continues, “has been really clear from the beginning that as powerful as that legacy is, the most important part is doing the work for oneself. There’s a difference between symbols and substance. We should be hushed and silent, and we should have the opportunity to learn what other people think, rendering our consciousness susceptible to divine influences.” She was fortunate to have been able to study a range of visual and performing arts without specialization.

The black experience has not necessarily been as documented in comparison to more privileged demographics. Perhaps not coincidentally, as this country has reckoned in recent years with the dire need for broader representation in all facets of the culture, there’s been a simultaneous renaissance in representational art. ‘I couldn’t understand the instructions I was getting [in class] so I just went out on the streets and thrived.” Monáe says. “I spend probably the majority of my time thinking about the nuance of color and composition, and that’s usually not the conversation.” Thelma Golden says. “For one, there is an institutional urgency to speak to a more diverse audience with painting that depicts the black community, the Asian-American experience, the Latino face, to attract the various people who had been excluded from the museum by remaking the history of figurative painting, this time with color” Monáe states, elaborating on Thelma Golden’s stances. “I’m in a place where the expansiveness of the work is most important to me. It’s about breaking more intrinsic systems to make room for people to flow in after. I come from relatives where having compassion for others and pursuing for equity is not negotiable. And my parents valued the things I would create; both of them have my artwork that spans my lifetime on their walls. I feel accomplished whenever I have the opportunity to help out others.”

Janelle Monáe is starring in Barry Jenkins’ limited series entitled “Heavy”, based on a memoir by Kiese Laymon. “I felt it would be very interesting to take his stories and his ideas, and utilize what he did to break through in order to go into the unconscious mind and critique the typical mother-son dynamics.” Monáe encourages distributors to continue to shed light on underrepresented individuals. “This is why adaptations are so vital,” Barry Jenkins says. “It's one thing to read a book and intellectually picture and imagine what these characters feel, but to see these actors give it full body is different.” Children are unable to create their circumstances, and “Heavy” represents those who want to protect their innocence as much as possible. The parental mandate to serve and protect, with disturbing authoritarian overtones, is fraught with difficulty. It’s a universal experience—your parents go from unimpeachable rulers to fallible human beings.  Human interactions often serve as focal points in her works, revealing how immigrant life merges—and rattles—disparate identities. The way that language gets rewritten through colonization and immigration has influenced Monáe when developing scripts. “English language, when altered, can be used to bear the burden of my African experience.” 

“I found I had to do things in a more minimal way. I want people to cherish the people they love, and think about what we can do to love each other better” she says in reference to her newly-released standalone single entitled Night Dreamer. “Night Dreamer is sung by a cautious woman. She dithers, wanting to be overtaken yet afraid of looking like she provoked the plunge. She's on the threshold between being in deep slumber and wakefulness. How you respect yourself or someone else in the most immediate relationship is political.” Janelle Monáe on window displays, industrial model making, movie sets and photographers’ props around her studies. “It was interesting to learn to put together the different creative areas … mixing theater and dance, and art, painting – all the different areas. Art is a sort of experimental station in which one tries out living.” In museums and galleries, we are free to move around, and turn away from what bewilders us. Janelle Monáe’s curation challenges that. She's an artist that strives to implement her culture and exhibit it as much as possible. Her indefatigable optimism carries her through moments of frustration.

In her performance, Monáe transformed the piano into a percussion instrument by inserting objects into its strings. Night Dreamer allows blues improvisation pieces to persist—in fact, the arrangements encourage them. The glimmering chimes and jarring bass beautifully opened the performance. Monáe was accompanied by a church choir, intersecting the multi-sections throughout the song. Further embellishing on her James Corden performance, Monáe proves that dance can be a conveyor of social message. Ultimately, “Night Dreamer” is an assertion of will. Good Morning America promoted the "Night Dreamer" physical copies after her performance and encouraged viewers to preorder the release of the "Night Dreamer" vinyls that are currently $7.99 on Black Friday.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
8 minutes ago, Nuclear Chicken said:

FoqVz34.jpg

I'm already excited because I see that you're a fan of artists that I adore (i.e. FKA Twigs and of course Janelle Monáe). Welcome!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Just now, Bleachella said:

r y’all still @ Alex’s room 

No it died

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
9 minutes ago, Frontline said:

I'm already excited because I see that you're a fan of artists that I adore (i.e. FKA Twigs and of course Janelle Monáe). Welcome!

Omg yes, don't even get me started. Absolutely obsessed. Nice to meet you!!!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
8 minutes ago, Nuclear Chicken said:

Omg yes, don't even get me started. Absolutely obsessed. Nice to meet you!!!

Omg Sam you joined st long last skfkskfk

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
19 minutes ago, Jon. said:

No it died

The ghost of Lindsay’s career is shaking

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.

  • Browsing now   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×