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4, BEYONCÉ and Lemonade selected by P4K on their “The Best Albums Of The 2010s”!

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Urbanov    46,679

41.

Beyoncé: Lemonade (2016)

The first thing Lemonade delivers is wrath: Infidelity has ruptured not just marriage but a whole life. Beyoncé, the world’s most powerful woman, is gleeful to set streets on fire, throw off her wedding ring, shit-talk with her girls to abandon. If Lemonade’s first 10 minutes has a headline, it would be that Jay-Z, dummy that he is, really did cheat. But then everything builds to something more profound, more complete: a prayer about how love can fracture the self. Suddenly we’re in Texas, in stadiums, on plantations; a Led Zeppelin beat is next to a reggae sample. “SpottieOttieDopaliscious” appears next to a James Blake feature.

Lemonade feels like an exercise in dissonance, the act of holding two warring ideas in your head and in your heart: You can love someone but also hate them, adore your father and also resent him, want to cry and twerk at the same time. One woman can feel all of this—and more—at once, Lemonade suggests, because that’s how confusing life and grief and history is. It exalts the mundane as profoundly spiritual: being black, being a woman, feeling confused, feeling grief, trying to forgive, feeling sexual. In all those, together, is the healing. –Hunter Harris

 

 

31.

Beyoncé: 4 (2011)

Before her albums were world-stopping cultural events, before a surprise release meant “pulling a Beyoncé,” there was 4. The superstar’s aptly named fourth album marked a return to hardcore R&B after 2008’s dispiritingly middle-of-the-road I Am...Sasha Fierce; it’s telling that nothing here cracked the Top 10 pop chart but several songs ran up the R&B/Hip-Hop chart. Beyoncé was done catering to visions of how her music should sound. The star power she enlisted was massive—Kanye and André 3000 cameoed, The-Dream and Tricky Stewart lent their songwriting chops (most notably on the perfect torch song “1+1”). And then there was a young Frank Ocean, who co-wrote the silken “I Miss You,” a song so powerful the demo allegedly made Beyoncé cry.

But ultimately the marquee star of 4 was Beyoncé’s indefatigable work ethic. She turned in 72 songs for this project; 12 made the cut of the standard release. (On that note: Stick with 4’s original sequencing—the reconfigured tracklist on Spotify snuffs its slow burn and displaces “Countdown” from the climax position.) She gave us more key changes than we ever thought we needed. (“Love on Top” has four!) And she blew with a late-anthropocene gusto, quivering and shaking around words, interpreting by the syllable. –Rich Juzwiak

 

 

3.

Beyoncé: Beyoncé (2013)

“We be all night,” Beyoncé proclaimed on “Drunk in Love,” the most meme-ready track on her self-titled album. She was singing about riding her husband’s big body like a surfboardt, but she may as well have been referring to the way listeners gulped down Beyoncé, which dropped at midnight on a Thursday and seemed to envelop all of social media into the dawn hours while also revolutionizing how albums are conceived and released.

The first major pop album to adapt to the way we listen to, and watch, music in the YouTube age, her first “visual album” couldn’t have worked if it weren’t Beyoncé at her absolute best. Over 14 tracks, she peels through her exhaustive musical vocabulary: married-woman trap bangers, ’80s-influenced roller-rink jams, grown-ass R&B, burlesque backseat scores, contemporary blues ballads. And then there was “Flawless,” which sampled Nigerian novelist Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie’s 2012 TEDX talk and helped establish Beyoncé as a fierce interpreter and purveyor of black feminist thought for the pop masses.

It’s difficult to understate how enduringly Beyoncé shifted culture (“I woke up like this!”), reasserting the artist as a full-spectrum visionary who was also dreaming up the future, invigorating the industry, maturing in her marriage, and blossoming into first-time motherhood. There is no doubt we’ll still be discussing it for decades to come. –Julianne Escobedo Shepherd

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Pauly Antonio    276

The fact that Beyonce has been top 5 in all of these decade end lists and some of these pop phags STILL undermine her?? 

the power

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montblanc    43
59 minutes ago, Pauly Antonio said:

The fact that Beyonce has been top 5 in all of these decade end lists and some of these pop phags STILL undermine her?? 

the power

bey10

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Urbanov    46,679
1 hour ago, Pauly Antonio said:

The fact that Beyonce has been top 5 in all of these decade end lists and some of these pop phags STILL undermine her?? 

the power

They can rot

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Diamond    49,125

All three are deserving of course but Lemonade being so low + behind 4 is... questionable brit15

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Pauly Antonio    276

a certain fanbase have been throwing tantrums about a certain someone being shut off both Pitchfork's songs and album lists.... bey11ari9brit9

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rosie    31

As expected of the holy trinity. 

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